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Videos uploaded by user “United States Holocaust Memorial Museum”
Sir Ben Kingsley talks about playing Itzhak Stern in Schindler's List
 
04:05
Sir Ben Kingsley spoke at the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum on March 1, 2011, for a special program devoted to the power of film and the Holocaust. In his conversation with NPR host Scott Simon, he discussed the opportunity to play Itzhak Stern in Schindler's List and working with Steven Spielberg. "The Power of Film and the Holocaust, An Evening with Sir Ben Kingsley" was a special event organized by the Washington Next Generation Board and made possible in part by The A.G. Newmyer III Foundation. Learn more about the Holocaust Museum's Next Generation Initiatives: http://www.ushmm.org/support/nextgen/. To learn more about the Holocaust at, see: http://www.ushmm.org.
Gerda and Kurt Klein describe liberation
 
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In this short video, Holocaust survivor Gerda Weissmann Klein and her husband, Kurt Klein, share their experiences of liberation and meeting for the first time. Gerda was born to a Jewish middle-class family in Bielsko, Poland. In 1942, she was deported to work in a textile mill in Bolkenhain, Silesia. Gerda was later sent to forced labor camps in Marzdorf, Landshut, and Gruenberg. She was liberated by the U.S. Army in May 1945. She met her husband when he and his troop liberated her and other women. She emigrated to the United States in 1946. Learn more about Gerda: http://www.ushmm.org/museum/exhibit/focus/klein/.
"It's Grandpa": Marcy Rosen's Extraordinary Discovery
 
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Marcy Rosen had never seen a photograph of her grandfather, Morry Chandler, as a young man. He is a Holocaust survivor, and all pictures from his childhood were lost or destroyed. But then Marcy found a pre-World War II film from his hometown in Poland on the Museum's website. And she spotted his fourteen-year-old face among a group of children and teens smiling at the camera. She immediately contacted the Museum to learn more about the film and the person who donated it. What happened next was a dream come true. Support the US Holocaust Memorial Museum to keep this history alive: http://act.ushmm.org/give The film from which the historic footage in this video is taken can be viewed on our web site: http://www.ushmm.org/online/film/display/detail.php?file_num=5216 Maurice Chandler's oral testimony is available online: http://holocaust.umd.umich.edu/chandler/
All That Was Left Was a Baby Jacket: The Radzinowicz Family Collection (Curators Corner #33)
 
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In this episode of Curators Corner, Teresa Pollin of the Museum's Art and Artifacts Branch shares the story behind a baby jacket that a Holocaust survivor kept for almost sixty-five years until her death in 2007. Her two daughters found the jacket among their mother's belongings after she passed away.
WWII POW Donates Artifacts to Museum
 
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On October 13, 2010, Anthony Acevedo donated personal materials to the Holocaust Museum's permanent collection. Acevedo, a medic with the US Army's 70th Infantry Division during World War II, was captured by the Germans at the Battle of the Bulge and became a prisoner of war. He and several hundred fellow soldiers were transferred to Berga am Elster, a section of Buchenwald concentration camp. Acevedo was charged with caring for his fellow prisoners and recorded in a small diary the names and numbers of those who died to ensure their sacrifice would be remembered. The Holocaust Museum is honored that he donated his diary and other materials to its permanent collection. For information on how to donate materials to the Museum, please visit http://www.ushmm.org/research/collections/donation/.
Sir Ben Kingsley on portraying Otto Frank in "Anne Frank: The Whole Story"
 
04:10
Sir Ben Kingsley spoke at the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum on March 1, 2011, for a special program devoted to the power of film and the Holocaust. In his conversation with NPR host Scott Simon, he recounts playing Otto Frank in the television mini-series, Anne Frank: The Whole Story (2001). "The Power of Film and the Holocaust, An Evening with Sir Ben Kingsley" was a special event organized by the Washington Next Generation Board and made possible in part by The A.G. Newmyer III Foundation. Learn more about the Holocaust Museum's Next Generation Initiatives: http://www.ushmm.org/support/nextgen/. To learn more about the Holocaust at, see: http://www.ushmm.org.
Eyewitness Testimony: General Roméo Dallaire
 
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General Roméo Dallaire from Canada was the commander of the United Nations peacekeeping force for Rwanda deployed in late 1993 as part of a peace accord between the Rwandan government and the rebel Rwandan Patriotic Front. When the violence began in April 1994, the UN Security Council reduced Dallaire's force from 2,700 to 270 soldiers. Without international support, Dallaire and his troops had to make wrenching decisions about where they could go and whom they could protect. Nonetheless, Dallaire and his force saved the lives of an estimated 25,000 people. In fall 1994, Dallaire returned to Canada, traumatized by his experiences in Rwanda. He eventually began to speak about what he saw, testified at the International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda against alleged perpetrators, authored a book on the genocide, and became involved in Canadian politics. He has become an advocate on the issues of response to genocide, child soldiers, conflict resolution, and post-traumatic stress disorder.
Secrets Inside: How a Boy's Bear Helped a Family Escape Nazi Persecution (Curators Corner #34)
 
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In this episode of Curators Corner, Becky Erbelding presents a teddy bear that helped Julius and Netty Butzke and their son Hans start a new life after they escaped Vienna in 1940. Hans' son Richard and granddaughter Eva share their family history and explain why the bear is so special to them.
The Nazi Olympics: African-American Athletes (Part 1)
 
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Part 1 of 2. Part 2 is here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Psz-8ccn7z8 Eighteen Black athletes represented the United States in the 1936 Olympics -- triple the number who had competed for the United States in the 1932 Los Angeles Games. African-Americans dominated the popular track and field events, and in the end, Black athletes brought home 14 medals, nearly one-fourth of the 56 medals awarded the U.S. team in all events. Many American journalists hailed the victories of Jesse Owens and other Blacks as a blow to the Nazi myth of Aryan supremacy. However, the continuing social and economic discrimination the Black medalists faced upon returning home underscored the irony of their victory in racist Germany. In this video, athlete John Woodruff, professor David Wiggins, professor Clayborne Carson, and author Jeremy Schaap reflect on the history of black athletes in American sports and the relevance of their achievements at the 1936 Olympics. To learn more about the 1936 Olympics, visit the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum at http://www.ushmm.org/museum/exhibit/online/olympics/
The Nazi Persecution of Jehovah's Witnesses: The Kusserow Collection (Curators Corner #21)
 
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In this episode of Curators Corner, Suzy Snyder discusses materials, including photographs and letters, that were donated to the Museum by members of the Kusserow family. As Jehovah's Witnesses, the Kusserows were persecuted by the Nazi regime. About 10,000 Jehovah's Witnesses, most of them of German nationality, were imprisoned in concentration camps during the Nazi period. For more information on the fate of Jehovah's Witnesses under the Nazis, visit our web site. http://www.ushmm.org/learn/students/learning-materials-and-resources/jehovahs-witnesses-victims-of-the-nazi-era
The Fake Diamond Ring that Helped Save Three Lives (Curators Corner #31)
 
07:00
When German soldies broke a chandelier in the Drohobycz ghetto, Abraham "Bumek" Gruber took some of the broken pieces and asked a jeweler make him a ring. Bumek was later able to use the fake diamond ring to ensure his survival as well as the survival of two other Jews, mother and daughter, when they escaped from the ghetto.
Liberation of Nazi Camps: John D. Rastelli
 
02:35
During the invasion of German-held Austria, the U.S. 11th Armored ("Thunderbolt") Division overran two of the largest Nazi concentration camps in the country: Mauthausen and Gusen. On May 5, 1945, the 11th arrived in Gusen, which had originally been a subcamp of Mauthausen. The division's arrival prevented the SS guards from murdering thousands of concentration camp prisoners by dynamiting the underground tunnels and factories where the inmates had been forced to work. The very next day, the unit liberated Mauthausen. In this interview, John D. Rastelli, a veteran of the 11th Armored Division, speaks with the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum about his experiences during liberation. To learn more about the 11th Armored Division or about the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum visit http://www.ushmm.org/wlc/article.php?lang=en&ModuleId=10006142.
Defying Genocide
 
18:59
Whenever genocide has occurred, individuals have risked their own lives to save others. How can their courage inspire us to defy genocide? This video features a conversation with Simone Weil Lipman who was able to save thousands of Jewish children during the Holocaust, and Damas Gisimba, director of a small orphanage in Rwanda that was besieged by militias during the 1994 genocide. Learn more about Weil Lipman and her story, and how Gisimba, with the help of American aid worker Carl Wilkens, managed to protect, care for, and save the lives of some 400 Rwandans.
Smallest Witnesses
 
05:51
During a 2005 mission to Darfurian refugee camps in Chad, two Human Rights Watch researchers gave children paper and crayons while their families were being interviewed. Unprompted, the children drew scenes of devastation: pictures of their villages being attacked by "Janjaweed," bombings by Sudanese government forces, the shootings, the rapes, the burning of entire villages, and the flight to Chad. The children, from seven refugee camps, insisted the drawings be shared with the rest of the world. In Smallest Witnesses: The Crisis in Darfur Through Children's Eyes, participants discussed the images created by the children, and the impact the crisis has had on its youngest victims. The program featured Jemera Rone, Sudan Researcher, Human Rights Watch; Olivier Bercault, Emergencies Researcher, Human Rights Watch; Dr. Annie Sparrow, Third Millennium Fellow, Harvard University Researcher, Human Rights Watch; and moderator Jerry Fowler, Staff Director, Committee on Conscience, U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum. To learn more about Darfurs smallest witnesses and the situation in Sudan, visit the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum at http://bit.ly/bSrNc.
Survivors Remember Kristallnacht: Robert Behr
 
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In this interview with the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum, Holocaust survivor Robert (Bob) Behr shares his memories of Kristallnacht, the November 1938 pogroms. To learn more about Kristallnacht, visit the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum at: http://www.ushmm.org/information/exhibitions/online-features/special-focus/kristallnacht
Reunion of Holocaust Survivors and their American Liberators
 
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On September 26, 2009 in Hudson Falls, NY, Hudson Falls High School and the US Holocaust Memorial Museum co-sponsored a reunion between Holocaust survivors and the U.S. Army soldiers who liberated them from a train near Magdeburg, Germany, on April 13, 1945. This video captures moments from the reunion, which was made possible by the efforts of high school teacher and Museum Teacher Fellow Matthew Rozell. Rozell's blog, "Teaching History Matters" (http://teachinghistorymatters.wordpress.com/) records his continuing work in locating soldiers and survivors from this event. To learn more about liberation during World War II, see http://www.ushmm.org/museum/exhibit/focus/liberation/. For information on the Museum's Teacher Fellowship program, visit http://www.ushmm.org/education/foreducators/prodev/teacherfellowship/.
Liberation of Nazi Camps: Dallas Peyton
 
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As Allied and Soviet troops moved across Europe during World War II in a series of offensives against Nazi Germany, they encountered concentration camps, mass graves, and numerous other sites of Nazi crimes. American soldiers witnessed evidence of the Holocaust and Nazi atrocities as they marched into the interior of Germany, liberating the major concentration camps such as Buchenwald, Dachau, and Mauthausen as well as hundreds of subcamps, including Ohrdruf (a subcamp of Buchenwald). Though the liberation of Nazi camps was not a primary objective of the Allied military campaign, U.S, British, Canadian, and Soviet troops freed prisoners from their SS guards, provided them with food and badly needed medical support, and collected evidence for war crimes trials. Dallas Peyton of Tucson, Arizona, was a member of the 70th Armored Infantry. In 1945, with other liberating troops, he entered the Dachau camp and encountered survivors and evidence of atrocities. In this interview, Peyton speaks to the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum about his experiences. To learn more about liberation of the Nazi camps visit the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum at http://www.ushmm.org/museum/exhibit/focus/liberation/.
Documenting Nazi Persecution of Gays: Josef Kohout/Wilhelm Kroepfl Collection (Curators Corner #13)
 
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In 1994, the Museum acquired the unique collection of Josef Kohout. More widely known as Heinz Heger, Kohout recorded his experiences in The Men with the Pink Triangle, the first published account of a gay survivor of the Nazi camps. Dr. Klaus Müller, the Museum's Representative for Europe, shares his story. Watch more episodes of Curators Corner: http://www.ushmm.org/research/collections/curatorscorner/. Considering donating original materials about the Holocaust to the US Holocaust Memorial Museum? See:http://www.ushmm.org/research/collections/donation/. Learn more about the Museum at http://www.ushmm.org.
Liberation of Nazi Camps: James Rose (U.S. 42nd Division)
 
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As Allied and Soviet troops moved across Europe in a series of offensives against Nazi Germany, they encountered concentration camps, mass graves, and numerous other sites of Nazi crimes. American soldiers witnessed evidence of the Holocaust and Nazi atrocities as they marched into the interior of Germany, liberating the major concentration camps such as Buchenwald, Dachau, and Mauthausen as well as hundreds of subcamps, including Ohrdruf (a subcamp of Buchenwald). Though the liberation of Nazi camps was not a primary objective of the Allied military campaign, U.S, British, Canadian, and Soviet troops freed prisoners from their SS guards, provided them with food and badly needed medical support, and collected evidence for war crimes trials. James A. Rose, of Toledo, Ohio, was with the 42nd ("Rainbow") Division during the liberation of Dachau. In this interview with the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum, Rose describes his impressions of the camp. To learn more about liberation of the Nazi camps, visit the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum at http://www.ushmm.org/museum/exhibit/focus/liberation/.
Survivors Remember Kristallnacht: Susan (Hilsenrath) Warsinger
 
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In this interview with the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum, Holocaust survivor Susan (Hilsenrath) Warsinger shares her memories of Kristallnacht, the November 1938 pogroms. To learn more about Kristallnacht, visit the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum at: http://www.ushmm.org/information/exhibitions/online-features/special-focus/kristallnacht
Some Were Neighbors: Collaboration and Complicity in the Holocaust
 
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The Museum's new exhibition, "Some Were Neighbors: Collaboration and Complicity in the Holocaust," calls attention to the tens of thousands of ordinary people who either actively collaborated with German perpetrators of the Holocaust or supported or tolerated the crimes that were carried out.
Survivor recalls rescue activity in Budapest and the role of Raoul Wallenberg
 
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Holocaust survivor Agnes Mandl Adachi describes helping in the rescue effort to pull Jews from the Danube River and the role of Raoul Wallenberg, the Swedish diplomat who worked to Hungarian Jews. Agnes was in Switzerland in 1939 to study French. She returned to Budapest in 1940. After the Germans occupied Hungary in 1944, Agnes was given refuge in the Swedish embassy. She then began to work for Swedish diplomat Raoul Wallenberg in his efforts to save the Jews of Budapest, including the distribution of protective passes (Schutzpaesse). When the Soviets entered Budapest, Agnes decided to go to Romania. Learn more about Wallenberg: http://www.ushmm.org/wlc/en/article.php?ModuleId=10005211.
A Cherished Object: Kristine Keren's Green Sweater (Curators Corner #3)
 
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Narrated by curator Susan Snyder, the third episode of the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum's Curators Corner series features the story behind the donation of a young girl's green sweater—a gift from her grandmother that she wore while hiding from the Nazis in the sewers of Lvov, Poland for fourteen months. Learn more about the Holocaust through the Museum's collections: http://www.ushmm.org/research/collections/curatorscorner/. Considering donating artifacts to the Museum? See http://www.ushmm.org/research/collections/donation/.
Edie's Story from the 20th Anniversary Tour Stop in Los Angeles
 
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During the Museum's Tour Stop in Los Angeles, Holocaust survivor Edith Ostern watched herself on the big screen in film previously donated to the Museum by her cousin, Robert Tennenbaum. The film shows them playing in Vienna less than a year before they and their parents fled for the United States thanks to the assistance of relatives already living there. Ostern donated additional artifacts at the Los Angeles event, including photographs and two small, delicate items of clothing she had brought with her from Vienna. She considers it her duty as a survivor to share her experiences with today's young people. Watch more film from the Marcus Tennenbaum collection on the Museum's website at http://resources.ushmm.org/film/search/result.php?titles=Marcus+Tennenbaum+Collection. The film that shows Ostern and her cousins playing in the park can be seen at http://resources.ushmm.org/film/display/detail.php?file_num=4526. You can find additional footage from the Museum's Steven Spielberg Film and Video Archive at http://www.ushmm.org/research/collections/filmvideo/.
Curator Discusses Handmade Book Donated by Gay Holocaust Survivor
 
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As young, gay, Jewish men living in Nazi Berlin, companions Manfred Lewin and Gad Beck faced much uncertainty. In 1941, Manfred made Gad a small, 17-page booklet, recording moments from their daily life and titled it, "Do you remember, when." In this short video, the Museum's Representative for Europe and curator of the online exhibition based on this artifact, Klaus Mueller, describes the story the book tells and recalls how the Museum came to acquire it. See the online exhibition on the diary: http://www.ushmm.org/museum/exhibit/online/doyourememberwhen/. Learn about the persecution of homosexuals during the Third Reich: http://www.ushmm.org/wlc/en/article.php?ModuleId=10005261.
The House of the Wannsee Conference
 
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On January 20, 1942, 15 high-ranking Nazi party and German government officials gathered at a villa in the Berlin suburb of Wannsee to discuss and coordinate the implementation of the "Final Solution." Reinhard Heydrich, SS chief Heinrich Himmler's head deputy and head of the Reich Main Security Office, held the meeting in order to involve key members of the German ministerial bureaucracy, including the Foreign and Justice Ministries, whose cooperation was needed to implement the killing measures. In this film by the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum, Dr. Norbert Kampe, Memorial and Educational Site Director of the Villa at Wannsee, takes viewers on a tour of the tortuous history of the house where the "Final Solution" was coordinated. See the house for yourself, and listen as decades of history--before during and after the war---unfold. To learn more about the Wannsee Villa or the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum visit http://www.ushmm.org/wlc/article.php?l&ModuleId=10005477&.
"I Have to Write Everything Down": The Diaries of Selma and Chaim Engel (Curators Corner #16)
 
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Selma Wijnberg and Chaim Engel met and fell in love in the Sobibor killing center. After the young couple made a daring escape during the camp uprising and fled into hiding, Selma began a diary to record their experiences. Learn about this unique testimony to history and love in the sixteenth episode of Curators Corner. Narrated by Archivist Rebecca Erbelding. See other Curators Corners: http://www.ushmm.org/research/collections/curatorscorner/.
Rescue
 
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The stories of ordinary people who chose to intervene and help rescue Jews, despite the risks, demonstrate that individuals have the power to make a difference. What we do—or choose not to do—matters. #irememberby #memory2action This video provides historical context for this subject and can be used to enrich your own remembrance event. Additional resources are available on our website: http://www.ushmm.org/remember/days-of-remembrance/organizing-a-remembrance-event/commemoration-themes/rescue
Eyewitness Testimony: Clemantine Wamariya
 
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Clemantine Wamariya was six years old when the genocide began in Rwanda. She and her sister Claire fled across the border to Burundi. They found themselves among a sea of refugees—with no immediate access to shelter, food, or other supplies. While international aid soon improved conditions, they constantly struggled to survive. Because of rumors of continued troubles inside Rwanda, they wandered from refugee camp to refugee camp for six years. In 2000, Wamariya and her sister gained asylum in the United States, and they settled in Chicago. A year later, Wamariya learned that her parents had survived the genocide. In 2006, Wamariya won Oprah Winfrey's National High School Essay Contest that asked, "Why is Elie Wiesel's book Night relevant today?" The Oprah Winfrey Show surprised Wamariya and her sister Claire by reuniting them with their family on the show. Wamariya has become an eloquent advocate against genocide today.
A Force For Change
 
07:11
At a time of rising hatred, antisemitism, and violent extremism around the world, the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum’s mission is more relevant and urgent than ever. As part of its campaign Never Again: What You Do Matters, the Museum is building a permanent global platform as a force against the vast span of intolerance, ignorance, and indifference. Meet Museum professionals who are inspiring new generations to create societies where hate can’t flourish.
Documenting the Path of American Liberators (part 4)
 
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Witness to History -- Documenting the Path of American Liberators As Allied and Soviet troops moved across Europe in a series of offensives against Nazi Germany, they encountered concentration camps, mass graves, and numerous other sites of Nazi crimes. Through documentation of the U.S. Army 167th Signal Photographic Company, this project honors the U.S. Army Divisions in World War II that liberated concentration camps. Part 4: The End of the War -- Liberation of Allied POWs (May 1945) -- Lenzing Concentration Camp (May 1945) -- Ebensee Concenration Camp (May 1945) -- The War Ends/Allies Reunion (May 1945) For more information about the liberation of Nazi concentration camps, visit the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum at: http://www.ushmm.org/museum/exhibit/focus/liberation/
Confronting the Holocaust: American Responses
 
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This year's Days of Remembrance theme marks the anniversaries of two seminal events in Holocaust history. What can we learn today from American action and inaction in the face of the refugee crisis in spring 1939 and the deportation of Hungarian Jews five years later?
Survivors Remember Kristallnacht: Johanna (Gerechter) Neumann
 
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In this interview with the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum, Holocaust survivor Johanna (Gerechter) Neumann shares her memories of Kristallnacht, the November 1938 pogroms. To learn more about Kristallnacht, visit the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum at: http://www.ushmm.org/information/exhibitions/online-features/special-focus/kristallnacht
"Chere Odette": The Letter of Charlotte Delbo (Curators Corner #19)
 
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Charlotte Delbo (August 10, 1913-March 1, 1985) and her husband Georges Dudach were arrested in March 1942 for their involvement in the French Resistance. Georges was executed in prison in May of that year. Charlotte spent nearly 11 months in a series of French camps. On January 24, 1943, Charlotte was one of 230 French women, members of the resistance, who were deported from France to Auschwitz. After a year in Auschwitz, Charlotte was sent to Ravensbrück. At the end of the war, she was one of only 49 women from the Janaury 24th transport who had survived. She never remarried. After liberation, Charlotte wrote about her experiences in the camps. She struggled to explain the unexplainable horrors she saw and lived through to readers who had not been there. Her memoir has been translated into English as Auschwitz and After (Yale University Press, 1995). While they were at Auschwitz, Charlotte and her fellow prisoners kept count of the days so that if they were ever freed they would be able to report death dates and last words to the family members of those who did not survive. In her book Convoy to Auschwitz: Women of the French Resistance (Northeastern University Press, 1997), Charlotte provided a biographical sketch of each of her fellow deportees--those who survived as well as those who died--from January 24, 1943.
Peter Feigl's Diary (Curators Corner #29)
 
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Born in Berlin in 1929, Peter Feigl moved with his parents to Prague and Brussels before they ended up in southern France in 1940. In 1942, Peter was at a Quaker summer camp when his parents were arrested. Learn about the diary Peter began after his parents arrest, how it disappeared, and how he recovered it decades later.
Defying Genocide (Part 1 of 3)
 
07:27
Whenever genocide has occurred, individuals have risked their own lives to save others. How can their courage inspire us to defy genocide? This video features a conversation with Simone Weil Lipman who was able to save thousands of Jewish children during the Holocaust, and Damas Gisimba, director of a small orphanage in Rwanda that was besieged by militias during the 1994 genocide. Learn more about Weil Lipman and her story, and how Gisimba, with the help of American aid worker Carl Wilkens, managed to protect, care for, and save the lives of some 400 Rwandans.
Curator Discusses Artifact Donated by Gay Holocaust Survivor
 
02:28
At the age of 17, Pierre Seel was arrested for homosexuality and imprisoned in the Schirmeck-Vorbrück concentration camp. After his release, his family forbade him to talk about his experiences. But his mother, at the end of her life, revealed to him a small object--a Mickey Mouse doll surrounded by the garland from her wedding veil--that she had made while he was in the camp that showed Pierre how much his mother had missed him. Learn more about this special object, which Seel donated to the Museum, in this short video. See another video about a different artifact donated to the Holocaust Museum by a gay survivor: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KY48eLz7Fbo. Learn about the persecution of homosexuals during the Third Reich: http://www.ushmm.org/wlc/en/article.php?ModuleId=10005261.
Rescuing Film: Preserving the Robert Gessner Collection (Curators Corner #39)
 
05:47
In 1934, Jewish American writer Robert Gessner traveled to Europe and the Middle East, where he filmed at least 10 reels documenting Jewish life. In 2014, his son donated the film to the Museum. In this episode of Curators Corner, film archivist Lindsay Zarwell shares some of the images he captured and explains how our colleagues at Colorlab and Video and Film Solutions helped us to restore and preserve this very rare footage. To view footage from the Robert Gessner Film Collection, visit: https://www.ushmm.org/online/film/sea...
Liberation and Return to Life
 
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View unique footage of liberation and its immediate aftermath through the eyes of the American soldiers who first entered Nazi concentration camps in the spring of 1945. Then witness the rebuilding of survivors' lives in displaced persons' camps, including films of vocational training, religious gatherings, and children at play. Watch more amateur film from the Steven Spielberg Film and Video Archive at http://www.ushmm.org/online/film/search/result.php?FilmVideo__StartDoc=1&FilmVideo__sort=score&FilmVideo__search_type=simple&FilmVideo__Query=&FilmVideo__is_digitized_cb_0=true
Holocaust survivor reflects on significance of "Remember Me?" project
 
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As a child, survivor Charlene Schiff was orphaned by the Holocaust. In this video, she offers a personal perspective on the importance of "Remember Me?", a new project from the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum that aims to discover what became of 1,100 children displaced and alone at the end of World War II. By publicizing photographs of these children, the Museum seeks the public's help to identify them, learn what happened to them, and facilitate renewed connections among these survivors, their families, and others who were involved in their care during and after the war. We hope to gather as much information as possible so that we can preserve the record of their experiences for future generations. Will you help us find them? Learn more about the Remember Me? project--and what you can do to help--at http://rememberme.ushmm.org/.
The Nazi Olympics: African-American Athletes (Part 2)
 
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Part 2 of 2. Eighteen Black athletes represented the United States in the 1936 Olympics -- triple the number who had competed for the United States in the 1932 Los Angeles Games. African-Americans dominated the popular track and field events, and in the end, Black athletes brought home 14 medals, nearly one-fourth of the 56 medals awarded the U.S. team in all events. Many American journalists hailed the victories of Jesse Owens and other Blacks as a blow to the Nazi myth of Aryan supremacy. However, the continuing social and economic discrimination the Black medalists faced upon returning home underscored the irony of their victory in racist Germany. In this video, athlete John Woodruff, professor David Wiggins, professor Clayborne Carson, and author Jeremy Schaap reflect on the history of black athletes in American sports and the relevance of their achievements at the 1936 Olympics. To learn more about the 1936 Olympics, visit the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum at http://www.ushmm.org/museum/exhibit/online/olympics/
General Roméo Dallaire Accepts Museum's Elie Wiesel Award
 
18:56
At the Museum's National Tribute Dinner on April 30, 2014, General Roméo Dallaire accepted the Museum's Elie Wiesel Award. With his unit in Rwanda in 1994, Dallaire protected over 30,000 lives. Since that time, he has been an outspoken advocate for genocide prevention. Read more about the 2014 Elie Wiesel Award recipient: http://www.ushmm.org/information/about-the-museum/the-elie-wiesel-award/2014
Eyewitness Testimony: Ron Haviv
 
02:08
In April 1992, photojournalist Ron Haviv was granted permission by the Serbian paramilitary leader known as Arkan to join his forces, the Tigers, as they entered the eastern Bosnian town of Bijeljina. Haviv became a witness to some of the first atrocities in the Bosnian war as the Tigers assaulted and killed Bosniak civilians. Despite being told not to take photographs, Haviv managed to document some of what he saw. Haviv continued to work in Bosnia throughout the war and later in Kosovo. His photographs provide some of the most stunning evidence of crimes from the Balkan wars (1991-99). His work to expose human rights violations in the Balkans, Latin America, the Middle East, Russia, and Africa - notably in Sudan and Democratic Republic of the Congo - has earned him the reputation as one of today's finest photojournalists.
The Nazi Olympics: Jewish Athletes (Part 2)
 
05:06
Part 2 of 2. German Jewish athlete Margaret Lambert (Gretel Bergmann), Dr. George Eisen, and American Jewish athletes Milton Green and Marty Glickman reflect on the dilemmas facing Jewish athletes and their experiences during the 1936 Olympics. To learn more about the 1936 Olympics, visit the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum at https://www.ushmm.org/wlc/en/article.php?ModuleId=10005680
The Frieda Belinfante Collection (Curators Corner #26)
 
03:52
Frieda Belinfante was born in Amsterdam in 1904. Her father was Jewish but her mother was not. Trained as a musician, Frieda was one of the first female conductors. During the Nazi occupation of the Netherlands, Frieda joined a Dutch resistance group. She forged identity documents for people hiding from the Nazis and their collaborators and helped to plan an attack on Amsterdam's population registry. Klaus Mueller, the Museum's European Representative, interviewed Frieda when she was 90 years old, just 9 months before she passed away. We thank Image Bank WW2/NIOD (http://www.beeldbankwo2.nl/index.jsp) for kindly giving us permission to use the photo of the destroyed population registry that appears in this video. Frieda's oral history can be viewed in its entirety on our web site: http://collections.ushmm.org/search/c.... You can view her photographs in our collection on our website: http://bit.ly/belinfante
Canon Andrew White Speaks on the Plight of Christians and Others in Iraq
 
02:22
Reverend Canon Andrew White is chaplain of the only Anglican church in Iraq. On September 15, 2014, he visited the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum to focus attention on the plight of Christians and other religious communities in Iraq. The Museum is concerned about the surge in group-targeted violence—specifically of religious communities, including Christians, Shi’a Muslims, Shabaks, Turkmen, and Yazidis in Iraq and beyond—since the rise of the extremist, self-proclaimed Islamic State (IS). According to the United Nations, more than 1.5 million Iraqis have been displaced by the conflict since June 2014, most of them forced to flee because of their religious beliefs. Under the 1948 UN Convention on the Prevention and Punishment of Genocide, the intentional destruction of religious groups constitutes genocide. According to Canon White, the Christian population in Iraq has declined from 1.5 million to 300,000 over the last 10 years, and it continues to shrink. Canon White has steadfastly maintained his commitment to his congregation and courageously continues to minister in Baghdad under great personal danger. Learn more at ushmm.org/genocide.
Sir Ben Kingsley on portraying Simon Wiesenthal in "Murderers Among Us"
 
04:32
Sir Ben Kingsley spoke at the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum on March 1, 2011, for a special program devoted to the power of film and the Holocaust. In his conversation with NPR host Scott Simon, he discussed portraying Simon Wiesenthal. "The Power of Film and the Holocaust, An Evening with Sir Ben Kingsley" was a special event organized by the Washington Next Generation Board and made possible in part by The A.G. Newmyer III Foundation. Learn more about the Holocaust Museum's Next Generation Initiatives: http://www.ushmm.org/support/nextgen/. To learn more about the Holocaust at, see: http://www.ushmm.org.
Liberation of Nazi Camps: Tarmo Holma
 
01:16
During the invasion of German-held Austria, the U.S. 11th Armored ("Thunderbolt") Division overran two of the largest Nazi concentration camps in the country: Mauthausen and Gusen. On May 5, 1945, the 11th arrived in Gusen, which had originally been a subcamp of Mauthausen. The division's arrival prevented the SS guards from murdering thousands of concentration camp prisoners by dynamiting the underground tunnels and factories where the inmates had been forced to work. The very next day, the unit liberated Mauthausen. In this interview, Tarmo Holma, a veteran of the 11th Armored Division, speaks with the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum about his experiences during liberation. To learn more about the 11th Armored Division or about the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum visit http://www.ushmm.org/wlc/article.php?lang=en&ModuleId=10006142.

Pubg Forums Xbox Can Be Fun for Everyone

Pubg Forums Xbox - Dead or Alive?

You need to compose an interesting and appealing profile, post a decent and recent photo and so forth. If youve got specific feedback for things we might change to create the system better, weve got forums for that. Our forums and internet chat area are a terrific place to meet and interact with different members.
An internet dating site devoted to health buffs for example, is pretty much enjoy a health club, but for the treadmill of course. If you prefer the most accurate price check, conduct the initial two methods and youll be helpful to go. There are several tier lists to help you decide which heroes you ought to be placing your time into, and thus dont take the word of the very first list you read. Instead, youre restricted to the amount of weapons and items you may carry at the same time. Especially if the quantity of players playing from PC proceeds to increase.
Pubg Forums Xbox Can Be Fun for Everyone

Its possible for you to reconnect at any point in a match youve left provided that you dont have a leaver penalty. There is no purpose in setting a question which everyone will know the response to. Another very good suggestion for your writing quiz questions is to attempt to keep the questions interesting. There are lots of totally free quiz questions online, but nevertheless, it can have a very long time to compose a great quiz and guarantee the answers are accurate so it can be well worth buying a pre-made quiz online. If a person doesnt know the answer, they ought to want to understand.
You will need to talk with your friend. If its not, attempt to stay friends with your initial friend. Not everybody is likely to get along so concentrate on the folks who have proven to be your true friend. In life, it is quite normal for individuals to have different friends and see them on various occasions.
If you disconnect during a competitive match, attempt to reconnect as soon as possible and complete the match. Of course whenever youre building the ideal team youll want the best heroes in the game. All it needed was a group of lemmings ready to have a beating.
Games unfortunately are a luxury and not a necessity, so they are most likely likely to be among the very first things to think about when deciding where you have to cut back on so far as your budget is concerned. In case you go over 100, youre out of the game. Finally, the play constricts to a very small area for the last showdown between the rest of the players there can only be one winner! Some players may discover that reinstalling PUBG is also essential. Many players can resolve their crashes by temporarily removing all graphics card overclocking. It is possible to always try out working with your fellow players and us Blue Posters here in order to get the reason for your tech issue.
The Death of Pubg Forums Xbox

Unlike PUBG, youre in a position to carry over two guns. Pressing Y cycles through your three guns, so if you would like to change from your secondary gun to your primary, you want to switch twice as a way to cycle via your pistol. In addition, all weapons are removed from the starting locations.