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Rolltop Desk by David Roentgen: Demonstration
 
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The inventive talents of David Roentgen are evident in this exceptionally refined desk. The monogram DR inlaid beneath the kehole on the lower drawer indicates the cabinetmaker's satisfaction with one of his most mechanically ingenuous creations: a single key inserted at different depths unlocks the center drawer, releases the rolltop, or releases the hidden side drawers; if a button is pressed on the underside of these drawers, each swings aside to reveal three other drawers. Above the rolltop, the rectangular structure consists of a single wide drawer. His artistic creativity is evident in the chinoiserie marquetry scenes, created by using minute pieces of naturally colored exotic woods that have a painterly effect. To learn more about this desk, please visit: http://www.metmuseum.org/Collections/search-the-collections/120013698 This desk is part of the The Metropolitan Museum of Art's exhibition Extravagant Inventions: The Princely Furniture of the Roentgens: http://www.metmuseum.org/en/exhibitions/listings/2012/roentgen Produced and Directed by Christopher Noey Editor Sarah Cowan Jib Operator Kelly Richardson Camera Wayne de la Roche Lighting Director Ned Hallick Grip Jim Purchase Production Coordinator Stephanie Wuertz Production Assistants Maureen Coyle Kate Farrell Jessica Glass Wardrobe Robin Schwalb Object Demonstration Wolfram Koeppe Additional contributions from Staci Hou Wolfram Koeppe Paco Link Tamara Schechter Eileen Willis A production of the Digital Media Department © 2012 The Metropolitan Museum of Art
Views: 229976 The Met
Abraham Roentgen's Writing Desk
 
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Discover the secret compartments of this writing table and see how it can be transformed into a private altar. Perhaps the most exquisite and technically refined piece from German cabinetmaker Abraham Roentgen (1711--1793), this desk was made for his premier patron, the Catholic official Johann Philipp von Walderdorff. Its interior holds a multitude of drawers, panels, and compartments, in addition to sophisticated mechanical fittings that safeguard the elector's privacy. This table is from Rijksmuseum, Amsterdam, and is on view at The Metropolitan Museum of Art in the exhibition Extravagant Inventions: The Princely Furniture of the Roentgens: http://www.metmuseum.org/en/exhibitions/listings/2012/roentgen More information about this object can be found here:http://www.rijksmuseum.nl/collectie/BK-16676/bureau-op-s-vormige-poten-versierd-met-marqueterie Footage courtesy of VideoART GmbH and Kunstgewerbemuseum, Staatliche Museen zu Berlin.
Views: 499974 The Met
MetCollects—Episode 6 / 2015: Michael Gallagher on "Everhard Jabach and His Family"
 
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"What does it take to revive a masterwork?" Michael Gallagher on conserving Charles Le Brun's Everhard Jabach and His Family Charles Le Brun (French, 1619–1690). Everhard Jabach (1618–1695) and His Family, ca. 1660. Oil on canvas; 110 1/4 x 129 1/8 in. (280 x 328 cm). The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, Purchase, Mrs. Charles Wrightsman Gift, in honor of Keith Christiansen, 2014 (2014.250) http://www.metmuseum.org/collection/the-collection-online/search/626692 MetCollects introduces highlights of works of art recently acquired by the Met through gifts and purchases. Discover a new work each month. http://www.metmuseum.org/collection/metcollects Credits Director: Christopher Noey Producer and Editor: Kate Farrell Camera: Sarah Cowan, Kate Farrell, Lisa Rifkind Design: Natasha Mileshina Music: Austin Fisher Explore more on MetMedia: http://www.metmuseum.org/metmedia/video
Views: 155070 The Met
Demonstration of the Roentgens' Dressing Table (Poudreuse)
 
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See a demonstration of how this desk operates. When closed, this table may not seem like one of the most complex pieces of European furniture ever made. However, once opened, its concealed drawers and hidden features are exposed, and the entire piece transforms into a dressing table, orpoudreuse. Scholars believe it was commissioned as a wedding gift from Abraham (1711--1793) and David Roentgen (1743--1807) by Friedrich August III, Elector of Saxony, to his bride in 1769. This table is from Museum für Angewandte Kunst, Frankfurt, and is on view at The Metropolitan Museum of Art in the exhibition Extravagant Inventions: The Princely Furniture of the Roentgens: http://www.metmuseum.org/en/exhibitions/listings/2012/roentgen
Views: 341648 The Met
Unfolding an 18th-century Game Table
 
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This finely crafted piece of furniture has a secret. Swing out a leg, adjust an arm, and voilà! Leaves unfold to reveal multiple configurations: a felt surface for card games, a game board for chess or checkers, a desk with a leather writing surface and book rest. Tug at a hidden latch, and a spring-driven backgammon board pops up. The brainchild of German cabinetmaker David Roentgen (1743--1807), this sophisticated game table once graced the intimate interior of an aristocratic European home. The exquisite piece was not only convenient for entertaining guests, but it was also portable—its legs unscrew so it can easily be packed and moved. This 3-D animation of the table demonstrates its different configurations and illuminates its concealed features, including drawers for tucking away personal items and compartments for storing game pieces. To learn more about the Game Table, please visit: http://www.metmuseum.org/Collections/search-the-collections/120050102 This table is part of the The Metropolitan Museum of Art's exhibition Extravagant Inventions: The Princely Furniture of the Roentgens: http://www.metmuseum.org/en/exhibitions/listings/2012/roentgen
Views: 202246 The Met
The Roentgens' Berlin Secretary Cabinet
 
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Discover the hidden features and intricate interior of this cabinet. One of the finest achievements of European furniture making, this cabinet is the most important product from Abraham (1711--1793) and David Roentgen's (1743--1807) workshop. A writing cabinet crowned with a chiming clock, it features finely designed marquetry panels and elaborate mechanisms that allow for doors and drawers to be opened automatically at the touch of a button. Owned by King Frederick William II, the Berlin cabinet is uniquely remarkable for its ornate decoration, mechanical complexity, and sheer size. This cabinet is from Kunstgewerbemuseum, Staatliche Museen zu Berlin, and is on view at The Metropolitan Museum of Art in the exhibition Extravagant Inventions: The Princely Furniture of the Roentgens:http://www.metmuseum.org/en/exhibitions/listings/2012/roentgen Footage courtesy of VideoART GmbH and Kunstgewerbemuseum, Staatliche Museen zu Berlin.
Views: 14404699 The Met
Conserving Michelangelo
 
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Watch a video showing the conservation of a Michelangelo drawing on loan from Christ Church Picture Gallery, Oxford, in preparation for the exhibition Michelangelo: Divine Draftsman and Designer. The Met's paper conservator Marjorie Shelley takes us through the complex and delicate process of restoring this beautiful architectural drawing. https://www.metmuseum.org/exhibitions/listings/2017/michelangelo Featured Artwork: Michelangelo Buonarroti (Italian, 1475–1564 ). Designs for a monumental altar or facade, possibly for San Silvestro in Capite, Rome. Pen and brown ink, brush and brown wash, black chalk, stylus ruling, and compass construction (recto), black chalk, some ruling in black chalk (verso). By permission of the Governing Body of Christ Church, Oxford (0992; JBS 64) Michelangelo: Divine Draftsman and Designer is on view at The Met Fifth Avenue from November 13, 2017, through February 12, 2018. #MetMichelangelo Supported by Bloomberg Philanthropies. Director: Kate Farrell Editor: Sarah Cowan Producer: Melissa Bell Camera: Wayne de la Roche, Sarah Cowan, Dia Felix Lighting: Dia Felix Production Coordinator: Kaelan Burkett Production Assistants: Bryan Martin, Stephanie Wuertz Original Music: Austin Fisher © 2017 The Metropolitan Museum of Art
Views: 145491 The Met
David Roentgen's Automaton of Queen Marie Antoinette, The Dulcimer Player (La Joueuse de Tympanon)
 
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Watch this surprising video of an automaton play the dulcimer. David Roentgen (1743--1807) took his royal patron by surprise when he delivered this beautiful automaton to King Louis XVI for his queen, Marie Antoinette, in 1784. The cabinetry for this piece is very much a neoclassical masterwork, and the mechanism behind it is truly extraordinary: the figure strikes the strings in perfect rhythm with two small metal hammers held in her hands, which move with great precision. This object is from Musée des arts et métiers de Paris and is on view at The Metropolitan Museum of Art in the exhibition Extravagant Inventions: The Princely Furniture of the Roentgens: http://www.metmuseum.org/en/exhibitions/listings/2012/roentgen View the full video here: http://www.cerimes.fr/le-catalogue/la-joueuse-de-tympanon.html Footage courtesy of CERIMES.
Views: 108392 The Met
Alexander McQueen: Savage Beauty - Gallery Views 2011
 
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Learn more about Alexander McQueen: Savage Beauty on view at the Met May 4--July 31, 2011: http://blog.metmuseum.org/alexandermcqueen/ The exhibition, organized by The Costume Institute, celebrates the late Alexander McQueen's extraordinary contributions to fashion. From his Central Saint Martins postgraduate collection of 1992 to his final runway presentation, which took place after his death in February 2010, Mr. McQueen challenged and expanded the understanding of fashion beyond utility to a conceptual expression of culture, politics, and identity. His iconic designs constitute the work of an artist whose medium of expression was fashion. The exhibition will feature approximately one hundred ensembles and seventy accessories from Mr. McQueen's prolific nineteen-year career. Drawn primarily from the Alexander McQueen Archive in London, with some pieces from the Givenchy Archive in Paris as well as private collections, signature designs including the "bumster" trouser, the kimono jacket, and the three-point "origami" frock coat will be on view. McQueen's fashions often referenced the exaggerated silhouettes of the 1860s, 1880s, 1890s, and 1950s, but his technical ingenuity always imbued his designs with an innovative sensibility that kept him at the vanguard. Producer/Director Christopher Noey Editor Kate Farrell Audio Editor Stephanie Wuertz Camera Jessica Glass Lighting Director Ned Hallick Production Assistant Sarah Cowan
Views: 108360 The Met
"Lachrimae" by John Dowland
 
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Christopher Morrongiello performs "Lachrimae" (ca. 1590s) by John Dowland (1563–1626), Cambridge University Library manuscript DD.2.11. Filmed in the Chapel from Le Château de la Bastie d'Urfé at The Metropolitan Museum of Art. Featured Instrument: Attributed to Wendelin Tieffenbrucker (German, active 1570–1610). Lute, late 16th century. Padua, Italy. Yew, spruce, ebony, maple. The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, Purchase, Gift of Mr. and Mrs. Robert P. Freedman, by exchange, 1989 (1989.13) http://www.metmuseum.org/collection/the-collection-online/search/503357 Recorded April 15, 2015 Credits Production support was provided by The Augustine Foundation. A production of the Digital Media Department The Metropolitan Museum of Art Producer and Director: Christopher Noey Editor: Kate Farrell Camera: Kate Farrell and Kelly Richardson Lighting: Ned Hallick Sound Recording and Post-Production Audio: David Raymond Production Coordinator: Stephanie Wuertz Production Assistants: Sarah Cowan, Maureen Coyle Organized by the Department of Musical Instruments J. Kenneth Moore, Frederick P. Rose Curator in Charge Jayson Kerr Dobney, Associate Curator and Administrator Bradley Strauchen-Scherer, Associate Curator Susana Caldeira, Associate Conservator Tim Caster, Principal Departmental Technician Marian Eines, Associate for Administration Pamela Summey, Assistant for Administration
Views: 184559 The Met
Viola, Benjamin Banks (1727--1795), London, 1791.
 
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Vocalise, Op. 34, No. 14 by Sergei Rachmaninoff (1873--1943), originally for voice, arranged for viola by David Aaron Carpenter. Performed by David Aaron Carpenter and Gabriela Martinez, piano. Viola, Gift of Dorothy and Robert Rosenbaum, 1979 (1979.177). Learn more about this instrument: http://www.metmuseum.org/Collections/search-the-collections/180015744 Production support was provided by The Donna and Marvin Schwartz Foundation A production of the Digital Media Department, The Metropolitan Museum Art Produced and Directed by Christopher Noey Edited by Sarah Cowan Camera by Wayne de la Roche and Jessica Glass Lighting by Ned Hallick Sound Recording and Post-Production Audio by David Raymond Production Coordinator: Stephanie Wuertz Production Assistants: Corinne Colgan, Robin Schwalb Organized by the Department of Musical Instruments J. Kenneth Moore, Frederick P. Rose curator-in-charge Jayson Kerr Dobney, Associate Curator and Administrator Susana Caldeira, Assistant Conservator Joseph Peknik III, Principal Technician Pamela Summey, Programs Coordinator Marian Eines, Associate for Administration
Views: 29302 The Met
Digital Reconstruction of the Northwest Palace, Nimrud, Assyria
 
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This video reconstructs the Nortwest Palace of Ashurnasirpal II at Nimrud (near modern Mosul in northern Iraq) as it would have appeared during his reign in the ninth century B.C. The video moves from the outer courtyards of the palace into the throne room and beyond into more private spaces, perhaps used for rituals. The video also shows the original location and painted colors of the relief depicting the winged, eagle-headed figure included in the exhibition Assyria to Iberia at the Dawn of the Classical Age (on view September 22, 2014–January 4, 2015). For production credits and exhibition information—including sponsorship credits—visit MetMedia: http://www.metmuseum.org/metmedia/video/collections/ancient-near-eastern-art/northwest-palace-nimrud
Views: 98880 The Met
An Art of Attraction: The Electrotyping Process
 
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Ellenor Alcorn, associate curator in the Department of European Sculpture and Decorative Arts at The Metropolitan Museum of Art, explains the nineteenth-century process of electrotyping and how it was used to create presentation copies of Tiffany and Company's famous silver Bryant Vase. Related exhibition: Victorian Electrotypes: Old Treasures, New Technology On view November 22, 2011, through April 22, 2012 Transcript: Ellenor Alcorn: The Bryant Vase was completed in 1876 by a team of skilled artists working for Tiffany and Company. They worked for more than a year meticulously chasing the sterling silver. Tiffany made a second vase for presentation using the electrotyping process. To make an electrotype, molds are taken of each section of the vase. A flexible molding material is applied to the surface —in this case, gutta percha, the sap of an East Indian tree. The mold hardens, leaving a precise impression. A coating of graphite makes the interior of the mold electrically conductive. Wires are attached to the inner surface. The mold is suspended in a copper-sulfite bath with a piece of copper and an electrical charge is applied. The negatively charged graphite attracts the positively charged copper ions, eventually building up to form a thick copper wall. When the copper is thick enough, the mold is removed from the bath. The copper form is separated from the mold. Additional copies can be made using this first example as a master pattern. The edges are trimmed and filed. The sections are soldered together. Then the copper is plated with silver, by immersing it in a bath of silver cyanide with a piece of silver. When the electrical charge is applied, a layer of silver is deposited on the surface. In order to perfectly match the original, the copy is oxidized. On the surface, the two vases seem to be identical in every minute detail, though the copper vase was made in much less time. Electrotyping had far-reaching uses, in the duplication of works of art, in manufacturing, and in the printing industry. This technology was one of many radical innovations made possible by the growth of electrical science.
Views: 17641 The Met
Rei Kawakubo / Comme des Garçons: Art of the In-Between
 
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Andrew Bolton, Curator in Charge of the Costume Institute discusses the exhibition "Rei Kawakubo/Comme de Garçons: Art of the In-Between," on view at The Met Fifth Avenue May 4–September 4, 2017. #MetKawakubo The Costume Institute's spring 2017 exhibition will examine the work of Japanese fashion designer Rei Kawakubo, known for her avant-garde designs and ability to challenge conventional notions of beauty, good taste, and fashionability. The thematic show will feature approximately 150 examples of Kawakubo's womenswear for Comme des Garçons dating from the early 1980s to her most recent collection. The exhibition is made possible in part by Condé Nast Production credits Director and Producer: Kate Farrell Editor: Sarah Cowan Camera: Alex Rappoport, Sarah Cowan, Dia Felix Interviewer: Christopher Noey Lighting: Ned Hallick Gaffer: Foster McLaughlin Production Coordinator: Lisa Rifkind Production Assistant: Kaelan Burkett Original Music: Austin Fisher Special thanks to: Nicholas Alan Cope, Ari Marcopoulos, Brigitte Niedermair, Collier Schorr In order of appearance: This video is provided courtesy of the Merce Cunningham Trust. © All rights reserved. Photograph by © Katerina Jebb Photograph by © Paolo Roversi Photograph by © Kazumi Kurigami Photograph by © Craig McDean Photograph by © Collier Schorr Photograph by © Peter Lindbergh Photograph by © Nicholas Alan Cope Photograph by © Brigitte Niedermair Photograph by © Ari Marcopoulos © 2017 The Metropolitan Museum of Art
Views: 19221 The Met
Afghani Rabab: "Valley" Folksong
 
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Afghani folksong entitled "Valley" written and performed by Quraishi and accompanied by Samir Chatterjee on tabla. Filmed in the gallery for the art of Mughal South Asia and Later South Asia at The Metropolitan Museum of Art on May13, 2013. A production of the Digital Media Department, The Metropolitan Museum of Art Produced and Directed by Christopher Noey Edited by Kate Farrell Camera by Kelly Richardson and Jessica Glass Lighting by Ned Hallick Sound Recording and Post-Production Audio by David Raymond Production Coordinator: Stephanie Wuertz Production Assistants: Sarah Cowan, Kate Farrell, Maureen Coyle Organized by the Department of Musical Instruments J. Kenneth Moore, Frederick P. Rose curator-in-charge Jayson Kerr Dobney, Associate Curator and Administrator Bradley Strauchen-Scherer, Associate Curator P. Allen Roda, Research Fellow Susana Caldeira, Assistant Conservator Joseph Peknik III, Principal Technician Pamela Summey, Programs Coordinator Marian Eines, Associate for Administration
Views: 245914 The Met
Sun Xun: Special Printmaking Demonstration in The Astor Court
 
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Sun Xun demonstrates his woodcarving process in relation to his video practice. View a related interview about his work "Some Actions Which Haven't Been Defined Yet in The Revolution" (2011), an animation video featured in the 2013 exhibition "Ink Art: Past as Present in Contemporary China": http://www.metmuseum.org/metmedia/video/collections/asian/sun-xun-ink-art Credits Producers: Maxwell K. Hearn and Chris Noey Videographers: Lisa Rifkind and Thomas Ling Interviewer: Xin Wang Editor: Ara Yun Qiu © 2015 The Metropolitan Museum of Art
Views: 32606 The Met
Pipa: “White Snow in Spring,” performed by Wu Man
 
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Recognized as the world’s premier pipa virtuoso and leading ambassador of Chinese music, Grammy Award-nominated musician Wu Man performs “White Snow in Spring”. Filmed in The Astor Chinese Garden Court, at The Metropolitan Museum of Art, April 13, 2016 “White Snow in Spring” first appeared in 1895 (Qing dynasty) as a hand-written score by pipa master Li Fangyuan's New Collection of Thirteen Pipa Score. Credits: Production support was provided by The Augustine Foundation Production Credits Producer and Director: Kate Farrell Production Coordinator: Lisa Rifkind Jib: Kelly Richardson Camera: Dia Felix Lighting design: Ned Hallick Gaffers: Foster McLaughlin, Mary Ellen Stebbins Editor: Kaelan Burkett Graphics: Natasha Mileshina Organized by the Department of Musical Instruments J. Kenneth Moore, Frederick P. Rose Curator in Charge Jayson Kerr Dobney, Associate Curator and Administrator Bradley Strauchen-Scherer, Associate Curator Tim Caster, Principal Departmental Technician Marian Eines, Associate for Administration Pamela Summey, Programs Coordinator Gillian Suss, Collections Management Assistant Support from Department of Objects Conservation Manu Frederickx, Associate Conservator Jennifer Schnitker, Assistant Conservator © 2016 The Metropolitan Museum of Art
Views: 76264 The Met
American Woman: Fashioning a National Identity - Gallery Views
 
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Learn more about the exhibition American Woman: Fashioning a National Identity on view at the Met May 5, 2010 - August 15, 2010: http://tinyurl.com/MetAmericanWoman American Woman: Fashioning a National Identity is the first Costume Institute exhibition drawn from the newly established Brooklyn Museum Costume Collection at the Met. It will explore developing perceptions of the modern American woman from 1890 to 1940 and how they have affected the way American women are seen today. Focusing on archetypes of American femininity through dress, the exhibition will reveal how the American woman initiated style revolutions that mirrored her social, political, and sexual emancipation. "Gibson Girls," "Bohemians," and "Screen Sirens," among others, helped lay the foundation for today's American woman. The exhibition is made possible by Gap Additional support is provided by Condé Nast
Views: 66935 The Met
"Manus x Machina: Fashion in an Age of Technology"—Gallery Views
 
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Gallery views of The Costume Institute's spring 2016 exhibition, Manus x Machina: Fashion in an Age of Technology, narrated by exhibition curator Andrew Bolton. The Costume Institute's spring 2016 exhibition, presented in the Museum's Robert Lehman Wing, explores how fashion designers are reconciling the handmade and the machine-made in the creation of haute couture and avant-garde ready-to-wear. #ManusxMachina Video Footage Excerpt from ONE LOOK (2015), presented by VisionaireFILM, directed by Stylianos Pangalos, produced by Cecilia Dean and James Kaliardos Excerpt from Making of the CHANEL Fall-Winter 2015/16 Haute Couture Collection, © CHANEL Excerpt from A new design by Iris Van Herpen, © Centraal Museum Utrecht/Wendy van Wilgenburg. Special thanks to Iris van Herpen and Materialise. Production Credits Director: Christopher Noey Producer: Kate Farrell Video Editor: Stephanie Wuertz Jib and Camera Operator: Kelly Richardson Lighting Designer: Ned Hallick Gaffers: Foster McLaughlin Production Coordinator: Lisa Rifkind Production Assistants: Dia Felix, Sarah Cowan © 2016 The Metropolitan Museum of Art
Views: 33196 The Met
#MetKids—Weave on a Mini Loom
 
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Follow along and learn how to weave yarn on a mini cardboard loom. Materials: • cardboard • ruler • pencil • scissors • yarn • tape • needle (a large plastic embroidery needle works well) Instructions: Make Your Loom 1. Measure and mark two borders that are 1/2 inch (1.5 cm) from the top and bottom of a small rectangular piece of cardboard. 2. Along the top border, mark lines down from the top edge of the cardboard that are spaced evenly apart (1/4 inch, or .6 cm, if you want them close together; 1/2 inch, or 1.5 cm, if you want them farther apart). Mark an even number of lines (6, 8, 10, etc.). 3. Repeat along the bottom border, making sure you space the lines in the same way. 4. Cut a slit from the border to the edge along each line you marked. Thread Your Loom 1. Tape the yarn on the back of the loom, under the first slit. 2. Turn your loom to the front and thread the yarn through the first slit at the top, then the first slit at the bottom. 3. Turn your loom to the back and thread the yarn through the next slit at the top. 4. Turn your loom to the front and thread the yarn through the second slit at the bottom. 5. Continue to thread the yarn like this through the rest of the slits. 6. When you've finished, cut the yarn and tape the loose end on the back. 7. This lengthwise, up-and-down thread is called the warp. Weave 1. Thread the yarn through the needle. It might be helpful to tie it to the needle. 2. This horizontal, left-to-right, right-to-left yarn is called the weft. 3. On the front of the loom, start weaving the weft under the first warp on the left and over the second warp, then under and over until you reach the right end. 4. Pull the weft yarn all the way through, but leave a tail (about 3 inches, or 7.5 cm) on the left side. 5. Loop the needle under the last warp on the right, so it catches. Then weave it over and under all the way to the left side. Pull the weft yarn all the way through, but not so tight that you pull the warp threads together. 6. Push the second row of weft tightly against the first. 7. Continue to weave the weft back and forth, under and over the warp, and push each row of weft tightly against the rest. 8. When you'd like to change colors, cut the weft yarn, leaving a tail (about 3 inches, or 7.5 cm). 9. Begin the new weft color where you left off and continue to weave. 10. Add as many colors as you like. 11. Once you fill the loom, cut the last row of weft yarn, leaving a tail (about 3 inches, or 7.5 cm). 12. Thread the loose tails into the looped ends of the weft and cut any extra yarn that sticks out. Remove Your Weaving 1. On the back of the loom, remove the tape from the ends and cut the warp in the middle. 2. Turn the loom to the front and pull two adjacent warp yarns from the slits and knot them together. 3. Repeat with each pair of warp yarns to remove the weaving from the cardboard loom. Credits #MetKids is a digital feature made for, with, and by kids! http://www.metmuseum.org/art/online-features/metkids/credits About #MetKids http://www.metmuseum.org/art/online-features/metkids/about Inspired by The 'Simonetti' Carpet and Diana and Actaeon from a set of Ovid's Metamorphoses. Closed captioning for this video is available in ten additional languages: #MetKids–نسج على منوال صغير #MetKids—在小编织板上编织 #MetKids—Faire du tissage sur un mini-métier à tisser #MetKids—Flechte auf einem Mini-Webstuhl #MetKids—Tessere ad un Mini-Telaio メットキッズ—ミニ織機で織る #MetKids—작은 베틀로 천 짜기 #MetKids—Costure em um mini tear #MetKids — Как плести на станке #MetKids—Tejiendo en un mini telar Supported by Bloomberg Philanthropies. © 2016 The Metropolitan Museum of Art
Views: 22187 The Met
"The Francesca" Violin, Antonio Stradivari (ca. 1644--1737), Cremona, 1694.  Ex. 2
 
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Liebesleid by Fritz Kreisler (1875--1962). Performed by Sean Avram Carpenter and Gabriela Martinez, piano. Violin, Bequest of Annie Bolton Matthews Bryant, 1933 (34.86.2). Learn more about this instrument: http://www.metmuseum.org/toah/works-of-art/34.86.2 Production support was provided by The Donna and Marvin Schwartz Foundation A production of the Digital Media Department, The Metropolitan Museum Art Produced and Directed by Christopher Noey Edited by Sarah Cowan Camera by Wayne de la Roche and Jessica Glass Lighting by Ned Hallick Sound Recording and Post-Production Audio by David Raymond Production Coordinator: Stephanie Wuertz Production Assistants: Corinne Colgan, Robin Schwalb Organized by the Department of Musical Instruments J. Kenneth Moore, Frederick P. Rose curator-in-charge Jayson Kerr Dobney, Associate Curator and Administrator Susana Caldeira, Assistant Conservator Joseph Peknik III, Principal Technician Pamela Summey, Programs Coordinator Marian Eines, Associate for Administration
Views: 168191 The Met
Demonstration of David Roentgen's Automaton of Queen Marie Antoinette, The Dulcimer Player
 
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Watch a demonstration of Queen Marie Antoinette's Automaton playing one of eight melodies it can perform. David Roentgen (1743--1807) took his royal patron by surprise when he delivered this beautiful automaton to King Louis XVI for his queen, Marie Antoinette, in 1784. The cabinetry for this piece is very much a neoclassical masterwork, and the mechanism behind it is truly extraordinary: the figure strikes the strings in perfect rhythm with two small metal hammers held in her hands, which move with great precision. This object is from Musée des arts et métiers de Paris and is on view at The Metropolitan Museum of Art in the exhibition Extravagant Inventions: The Princely Furniture of the Roentgens: http://www.metmuseum.org/en/exhibitions/listings/2012/roentgen View a full documentary on this object: http://www.cerimes.fr/le-catalogue/la-joueuse-de-tympanon.html
Views: 253512 The Met
Cristofori Piano: Sonata number 6 by Lodovico Giustini
 
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Dongsok Shin performs the Giga of Sonata number 6 in B flat major by Lodovico Giustini (1685-1743) on the earliest known surviving piano, made by the instrument's inventor, Bartolomeo Cristofori (1655-1731), in Florence, 1720. This sonata is from the 12 Sonate da cimbalo di piano e forte detto volgarmente di martelletti, Op. 1, written in 1732. These are the first known pieces to have been composed specifically for the piano. Production support was provided by The Donna and Marvin Schwartz Foundation. A production of the Digital Media Department The Metropolitan Museum of Art Produced and Directed by Christopher Noey Edited by Kate Farrell Camera by Kelly Richardson and Jessica Glass Lighting by Ned Hallick Sound Recording and Post-Production Audio by David Raymond Production Coordinator: Stephanie Wuertz Production Assistants: Sarah Cowan, Maureen Coyle Organized by the Department of Musical Instruments J. Kenneth Moore, Frederick P. Rose Curator-in-Charge Jayson Kerr Dobney, Associate Curator and Administrator E. Bradley Strauchen-Scherer, Associate Curator Susana Caldeira, Assistant Conservator Dongsok Shin, keyboard technician Joseph Peknik III, Principal Technician Pamela Summey, Programs Coordinator Marian Eines, Associate for Administration
Views: 117498 The Met
Conserving the Damascus Room at The Metropolitan Museum of Art
 
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The Damascus Room (1707) served as the reception area within a Syrian home of the Ottoman period. Extensive conservation and historical research were carried out by the Metropolitan Museum in preparation for the opening of the new galleries. Open November 1, 2011 Producer Christopher Noey Editor Jessica Glass Camera Jessica Glass Stephanie Wuertz Sound Robin Schwalb David Raymond Production Assistant Sarah Cowan
Views: 38571 The Met
The Artist Project: John Baldessari
 
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John Baldessari on Philip Guston's "Stationary Figure" "I think it's brilliant: making art look like it's not about skill." The Artist Project is an online series in which artists respond to works of art in The Met’s encyclopedic collection. Now available as a book published by Phaidon in cooperation with The Metropolitan Museum of Art. Purchase a copy: http://store.metmuseum.org/art-history+reference/the-artist-project-what-artists-see-when-they-look-at-art/invt/80037399 http://www.metmuseum.org/ArtistProject/john-baldessari
Views: 17222 The Met
After the Fall: The Conservation of Tullio Lombardo's "Adam"
 
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Conservators, scientists, and curators tell the story behind the unprecedented conservation of Tullio Lombardo's "Adam." For more information, including production credits, view this video on MetMedia: http://www.metmuseum.org/metmedia/video/collections/esda/after-the-fall
Views: 18113 The Met
Michelangelo: Divine Draftsman & Designer
 
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Watch a video preview of the exhibition Michelangelo: Divine Draftsman & Designer, on view at The Met Fifth Avenue from November 13, 2017 through February 12, 2018. Featuring Carmen Bambach, Curator, Drawings and Prints, The Met Michelangelo Buonarroti (1475–1564), a towering genius in the history of Western art, will be the subject of this once-in-a-lifetime exhibition. During his long life, Michelangelo was celebrated for the excellence of his disegno, the power of drawing and invention that provided the foundation for all the arts. For his mastery of drawing, design, sculpture, painting, and architecture, he was called Il Divino ("the divine one") by his contemporaries. His powerful imagery and dazzling technical virtuosity transported viewers and imbued all of his works with a staggering force that continues to enthrall us today. #MetMichelangelo http://www.metmuseum.org/exhibitions/listings/2017/michelangelo The exhibition is made possible by Morgan Stanley. Additional support is provided by an anonymous donor, the Gail and Parker Gilbert Fund, the Diane W. and James E. Burke Fund, Dinah Seiver and Thomas E. Foster, Cathrin M. Stickney and Mark P. Gorenberg, Ann M. Spruill and Daniel H. Cantwell, and Mark Pigott KBE Family. The catalogue is made possible by the Drue E. Heinz Fund. Additional support is provided by the Wolfgang Ratjen Stiftung, Liechtenstein. Production Credits: Director: Kate Farrell Producer: Melissa Bell Interviewer: Christopher Noey Editor: Sarah Cowan Camera: Sarah Cowan, Dia Felix Lighting: Dia Felix Production Coordinator: Kaelan Burkett Production Assistants: Bryan Martin, Liam O’Connell Original Music: Austin Fisher Images courtesy of: © Albertina, Vienna Archivio Fotografico Gallerie dell’Accademia, Ministero dei beni e delle attività culturali e del turismo. Museo Nazionale Gallerie dell’Accademia di Venezia, Gabinetto dei disegni e stampe © Ashmolean Museum, University of Oxford Casa Buonarroti, Florence, photo by Antonio Quattrone French State, Ministry of Foreign and European Affairs Gabinetto Fotografico delle Gallerie degli Uffizi Imaging Department © President and Fellows of Harvard College J. Paul Getty Museum Open Content Program Ministero dei Beni e delle Attivita Culturali e del Turismo, Musei Reali - Biblioteca Reale, Torino © Musée du Louvre, Dist. RMN-Grand Palais / Suzanne Nagy Museo Nazionale del Bargello, photo by Antonio Quattrone Museum Boijmans Van Beuningen, photo by Studio Tromp, Rotterdam © RMN-Grand Palais / Art Resource, NY, photo by Michèle Bellot © RMN-Grand Palais / Art Resource, NY, photo by Gérard Blot © RMN-Grand Palais / Art Resource, NY, photo by Thierry Le Mage Royal Collection Trust / © Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II 2017 © The Trustees of the British Museum © 2017 The Metropolitan Museum of Art
Views: 11822 The Met
Vladimir Gorbach plays El Mestre by Miguel Llobet
 
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El Mestre by Miguel Llobet (1878--1938) played by Vladimir Gorbach. Filmed in the Patio from the Castle of Vélez Blanco at The Metropolitan Museum of Art, February, 2013. Performed on a guitar made in the workshop of José Ramírez III (1922--1995) by Mariano Tezanos Martin (born 1949) in Madrid, 1967. Ex coll.: Christopher Parkening. Learn more about this instrument at: http://www.metmuseum.org/Collections/search-the-collections/180019021 Production support was provided by The Augustine Foundation A production of the Digital Media Department The Metropolitan Museum of Art Produced and Directed by Christopher Noey Edited by Kate Farrell Camera by Kate Farrell and Jessica Glass Lighting by Ned Hallick Sound Recording and Post-Production Audio by Marlan Barry Production Coordinator: Stephanie Wuertz Production Assistants: Sarah Cowan, Maureen Coyle Organized by the Department of Musical Instruments J. Kenneth Moore, Frederick P. Rose curator-in-charge Jayson Kerr Dobney, Associate Curator and Administrator Bradley Strauchen-Scherer, Associate Curator Susana Caldeira, Assistant Conservator Joseph Peknik III, Principal Technician Pamela Summey, Programs Coordinator Marian Eines, Associate for Administration
Views: 34572 The Met
Jorge Caballero plays El Puerto, by Isaac Albeniz
 
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El Puerto from Book One of the Iberia Suite by Isaac Albéniz (1860--1909) played by Jorge Caballero. Filmed in the Patio from the Castle of Vélez Blanco at The Metropolitan Museum of Art, February, 2013. Performed on a guitar made by Hermann Hauser (1882--1952) in Munich, 1940. On loan from The Augustine Foundation. Production support was provided by The Augustine Foundation A production of the Digital Media Department The Metropolitan Museum of Art Produced and Directed by Christopher Noey Edited by Kate Farrell Camera by Kate Farrell and Jessica Glass Lighting by Ned Hallick Sound Recording and Post-Production Audio by Marlan Barry Production Coordinator: Stephanie Wuertz Production Assistants: Sarah Cowan, Maureen Coyle Organized by the Department of Musical Instruments J. Kenneth Moore, Frederick P. Rose curator-in-charge Jayson Kerr Dobney, Associate Curator and Administrator Bradley Strauchen-Scherer, Associate Curator Susana Caldeira, Assistant Conservator Joseph Peknik III, Principal Technician Pamela Summey, Programs Coordinator Marian Eines, Associate for Administration
Views: 58569 The Met
Cristofori Piano: Sonata K.9 by Domenico Scarlatti
 
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Dongsok Shin performs the Sonata in d minor, K.9 by Domenico Scarlatti (1685-1757) on the earliest known surviving piano, made by the instrument's inventor, Bartolomeo Cristofori (1655-1731), in Florence, 1720. Scarlatti's keyboard compositions were performed on both the harpsichord and the early piano. Production support was provided by The Donna and Marvin Schwartz Foundation A production of the Digital Media Department The Metropolitan Museum of Art Produced and Directed by Christopher Noey Edited by Kate Farrell Camera by Kelly Richardson and Jessica Glass Lighting by Ned Hallick Sound Recording and Post-Production Audio by David Raymond Production Coordinator: Stephanie Wuertz Production Assistants: Sarah Cowan, Maureen Coyle Organized by the Department of Musical Instruments J. Kenneth Moore, Frederick P. Rose Curator-in-Charge Jayson Kerr Dobney, Associate Curator and Administrator E. Bradley Strauchen-Scherer, Associate Curator Susana Caldeira, Assistant Conservator Dongsok Shin, keyboard technician Joseph Peknik III, Principal Technician Pamela Summey, Programs Coordinator Marian Eines, Associate for Administration
Views: 190184 The Met
Building the Moroccan Court
 
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In 2011, The Metropolitan Museum of Art opened the New Galleries for the Art of the Arab Lands, Turkey, Iran, Central Asia, and Later South Asia, which house the Museum's renowned collection of Islamic art. A vital part of the installation was the Patti Cadby Birch Court, a Moroccan court built by a team of experts—from curators and historians to designers and craftsmen—over many months. Complementing the works on view, which span the past fourteen hundred years, the Moroccan Court provides an experience of space and architecture while demonstrating artistic traditions that still thrive in the Islamic world. This video documents a marvelous journey from Fez to New York, and the creation of a twenty-first-century court using traditional fifteenth-century methods. The court was made possible by the Patti and Everett B. Birch Foundation. Explore more at MetMedia: http://www.metmuseum.org/metmedia/video
Views: 166788 The Met
Behind the Scenes: Julien d'Ys Creates Heads and Wigs for The Model as Muse
 
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Learn more about the exhibition "The Model as Muse: Embodying Fashion," on view at the Met May 6 - August 9, 2009: http://tinyurl.com/dhkqk9 Julien dYs, working in his Lower Manhattan studio, designs heads and wigs for the exhibition "The Model as Muse: Embodying Fashion." The artist talks about his creative process, his inspiration, and his own muses as he prepares for the exhibition, on view at the Metropolitan Museum of Art May 6 through August 9, 2009. Heads and wigs created and styled by Julien dYs and the Tamaris team. Produced and Directed by Christopher Noey Director of Photography: Jessica Glass Editor: Kate Farrell Production Assistant: Angela Kim
Views: 40762 The Met
The Artist Project: George Condo
 
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George Condo on Claude Monet's "The Path through the Irises" "Something that is so sort of horrible turns into this exquisite daydream." The Artist Project is an online series in which artists respond to works of art in The Met’s encyclopedic collection. Now available as a book published by Phaidon in cooperation with The Metropolitan Museum of Art. Purchase a copy: http://store.metmuseum.org/art-history+reference/the-artist-project-what-artists-see-when-they-look-at-art/invt/80037399 http://www.metmuseum.org/ArtistProject/george-condo
Views: 6111 The Met
"China: Through the Looking Glass"—Gallery Views
 
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Gallery views of The Costume Institute's spring 2015 exhibition, "China: Through the Looking Glass," narrated by exhibition curator Andrew Bolton. The exhibition is made possible by Yahoo. Additional support is provided by Condé Nast and several Chinese donors. http://www.metmuseum.org/exhibitions/listings/2015/china-through-the-looking-glass Credits Director and Producer: Christopher Noey Video Editor: Kate Farrell Audio Editor: Stephanie Wuertz Jib and Camera Operator: Kelly Richardson Second Camera: Alex Rappoport Lighting Designer: Ned Hallick Gaffers: Foster McLaughlin, Julio Yurnet Production Assistant: Lisa Rifkind © 2015 The Metropolitan Museum of Art Artwork credit: Andy Warhol (American, 1928–1987). Mao, 1973. Acrylic and silkscreen on canvas; 12 x 10 1/8 in. (30.5 x 25.4 cm). The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, Gift of Halston, 1983 (1983.606.8). © 2015 The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Inc. / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York http://www.metmuseum.org/collection/the-collection-online/search/677114 Explore more at MetMedia: http://www.metmuseum.org/metmedia/video
Views: 33896 The Met
82nd & Fifth: "Thinking Aloud" by Carmen Bambach
 
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http://82nd-and-fifth.metmuseum.org/thinking-aloud Explore this object: http://82nd-and-fifth.metmuseum.org/michelangelo-buonarroti-italian-studies-for-the-libyan-sibyl-recto-studies-for-the-libyan-sibyl-and "I can see the humanity in a way, the figure breathing." 82nd & Fifth invites 100 curators from across the Museum to talk about 100 works of art that changed the way they see the world. iPad App available in English, Arabic, Chinese, French, German, Italian, Japanese, Korean, Portuguese, Russian, and Spanish: https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/82nd-fifth-from-the-met/id903909632?ls=1&mt=8
Views: 20896 The Met
Rei Kawakubo/Comme des Garçons: Art of the In-Between—Gallery Views
 
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Gallery views of The Costume Institute's spring 2017 exhibition, Rei Kawakubo/Comme des Garçons: Art of the In-Between, narrated by exhibition curator Andrew Bolton. The Costume Institute's spring 2017 exhibition examines the work of Japanese fashion designer Rei Kawakubo, known for her avant-garde designs and ability to challenge conventional notions of beauty, good taste, and fashionability. The thematic show features approximately 140 examples of Kawakubo's womenswear for Comme des Garçons dating from the early 1980s to her most recent collection. #MetKawakubo The exhibition is made possible in part by Condé Nast Director and Producer: Kate Farrell Editors: Dia Felix, Sarah Cowan Jib and Camera Operator: Kelly Richardson Lighting Designer: Ned Hallick Gaffers: Foster McLaughlin, Christopher Yurnet Production Assistants: Kaelan Burkett, Stephanie Wuertz Music: Austin Fisher © 2017 The Metropolitan Museum of Art
Views: 11306 The Met
82nd & Fifth: "The Choice" by Walter Liedtke
 
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http://82nd-and-fifth.metmuseum.org/the-choice Explore this object: http://82nd-and-fifth.metmuseum.org/rembrandt-rembrandt-van-rijn-dutch-aristotle-with-a-bust-of-homer-61.198 The central problem of Western civilization is reduced to one guy who's got to puzzle it out for himself. 82nd & Fifth invites 100 curators from across the Museum to talk about 100 works of art that changed the way they see the world. iPad App available in English, Arabic, Chinese, French, German, Italian, Japanese, Korean, Portuguese, Russian, and Spanish: https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/82nd-fifth-from-the-met/id903909632?ls=1&mt=8
Views: 17796 The Met
Jan Gossart - Conservation Discoveries
 
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Learn more about the exhibition Man, Myth, and Sensual Pleasures: Jan Gossart's Renaissance on view at the Met October 6, 2010--January 17, 2011: http://tinyurl.com/JanGossart The first major exhibition in forty-five years devoted to the Burgundian Netherlandish artist Jan Gossart (ca. 1478-1532) will bring together Gossart's paintings, drawings, and prints and place them in the context of the art and artists that influenced his transformation from Late Gothic Mannerism to the new Renaissance mode. Gossart was among the first northern artists to travel to Rome to make copies after antique sculpture and introduce historical and mythological subjects with erotic nude figures into the mainstream of northern painting. Most often credited with successfully assimilating Italian Renaissance style into northern European art of the early sixteenth century, he is the pivotal Old Master who changed the course of Flemish art from the Medieval craft tradition of its founder, Jan van Eyck (ca. 1380/90--1441), and charted new territory that eventually led to the great age of Peter Paul Rubens (1577--1640). Correction: Karen Thomas, Associate Conservator, Department of Paintings Conservation Producer and Director: Christopher Noey Editor: Kate Farrell Digital Images and Animation: Paul Caro Camera: Wayne De La Roche, Jessica Glass Sound Recording: David Raymond Production Assistants: Sarah Cowan, Robin Schwalb
Views: 33219 The Met
El Anatsui installing "Between Earth and Heaven"
 
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Learn more about this work of art: http://www.metmuseum.org/toah/ho/11/sfg/ho_2007.96.htm A behind-the-scenes view of the installation of Between Earth and Heaven, a monumental wall-mounted sculpture in recycled aluminum and copper wire, in the African galleries of the Michael C. Rockefeller Wing of The Metropolitan Museum of Art. Curator Alisa LaGamma and artist El Anatsui talk about the installation and its significance, and the artist speaks about his process and influences when creating the piece. Produced and Directed by Christopher Noey. Director of Photography, Wayne de la Roche; Editor, Jessica Glass; Sound Recording, Thomas Myers; Additional Camera, Jessica Glass; Assistant Editor, Shravan Vidyarthi; Production Assistants, Kate Farrell and Robin Schwalb. Hear an interview with El Anatsui: http://www.metmuseum.org/podcast/detail.asp?eid=epNum022
Views: 23222 The Met
The Emperor's Private Paradise: Virtual tour of Juanqinzhai
 
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The Emperor's Private Paradise: Treasures from the Forbidden City on view at the Met February 1, 2011--May 1, 2011: http://met.org/dVMPrs This loan exhibition organized by the Peabody Essex Museum presents some ninety paintings, decorative works, architectural elements, and religious works created for an elaborate two-acre private retreat built deep within the Forbidden City in 1771 as the retirement residence of one of China's most extravagant monarchs—the Qianlong Emperor (r. 1736--95)—who presided over China's last dynasty, the Qing, at the zenith of its power and wealth. No expense was spared to make this complex as sumptuous and comfortable as possible. The costliest materials, including rare woods, semiprecious stones, cloisonné, gilt bronze, porcelain, and lacquer were employed to ornament every surface of this world. In the end the emperor declined to retire here and the space remained a virtual time capsule relatively untouched since imperial times.
Views: 11900 The Met
Installation of the Statue of Athena Parthenos (ca. 170 B.C.)
 
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On August 4, 2016, a monumental statue of Athena Parthenos (ca. 170 B.C.) from Pergamon was installed in The Met's Great Hall. A special loan from the collection of the Pergamon Museum in Berlin, the statue will remain on display in the Great Hall for two years. Production Credits Producer: Kate Farrell Editor: Sarah Cowan Camera: Sarah Cowan, Stephanie Wuertz Production Coordinator: Lisa Rifkind Production Assistant: Kaelan Burkett Original Music: Austin Fisher © 2016 The Metropolitan Museum of Art
Views: 17238 The Met
Sara Berman's Closet
 
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Maira Kalman and Alex Kalman discuss the installation of the exhibition Sarah Berman's Closet, on view at The Met Fifth Avenue from March 6 through September 5, 2017. The meticulously organized, modest closet in which Sara Berman (1920–2004)—an immigrant who traveled from Belarus to Palestine to New York—kept her all-white apparel and accessories both contained her life and revealed it. Inspired by the beauty and meaning of Berman's closet, the artists Maira and Alex Kalman (who are also Berman's daughter and grandson) have recreated the closet and its contents as an art installation. #SaraBermansCloset
Views: 6137 The Met
Jorge Caballero plays Evocación, by Isaac Albeniz
 
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Evocación from Book One of the Iberia Suite by Isaac Albéniz (1860--1909) played by Jorge Caballero. Filmed in the Patio from the Castle of Vélez Blanco at The Metropolitan Museum of Art, February, 2013. Performed on a guitar made by Hermann Hauser (1882--1952) in Munich, 1940. On loan from The Augustine Foundation. Production support was provided by The Augustine Foundation A production of the Digital Media Department The Metropolitan Museum of Art Produced and Directed by Christopher Noey Edited by Kate Farrell Camera by Kate Farrell and Jessica Glass Lighting by Ned Hallick Sound Recording and Post-Production Audio by Marlan Barry Production Coordinator: Stephanie Wuertz Production Assistants: Sarah Cowan, Maureen Coyle Organized by the Department of Musical Instruments J. Kenneth Moore, Frederick P. Rose curator-in-charge Jayson Kerr Dobney, Associate Curator and Administrator Bradley Strauchen-Scherer, Associate Curator Susana Caldeira, Assistant Conservator Joseph Peknik III, Principal Technician Pamela Summey, Programs Coordinator Marian Eines, Associate for Administration
Views: 51681 The Met
Conserving the Emperor's Carpet
 
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The magnificent sixteenth-century Emperor's Carpet from Safavid Iran was acquired by the Metropolitan Museum in 1941, but its condition was so fragile that it was only displayed for public twice over the next sixty years. This video documents the ambitious three-year conservation program that was launched in 2006 to stabilize the condition of the carpet so its lustrous wools and dazzling colors can be displayed the Museum on a regular basis. This video is presented in conjunction with the exhibition Making the Invisible Visible: Conservation and Islamic Art, on view April 2 through August 4, 2013. The exhibition is made possible by The Hagop Kevorkian Fund.
Views: 66521 The Met
Golden Kingdoms: Luxury & Legacy in the Ancient Americas
 
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Watch a video preview of the exhibition Golden Kingdoms: Luxury & Legacy in the Ancient Americas. On view at The Met Fifth Avenue from February 28 through May 28, 2018. Featuring Joanne Pillsbury, Andrall E. Pearson Curator of Ancient American Art, The Met. This landmark exhibition of luxury arts of the Incas, the Aztecs, and their predecessors will trace the emergence and florescence of goldworking in the ancient Americas, from its earliest appearance in the Andes to its later developments farther north in Central America and Mexico. In the ancient Americas, metalworking developed in the context of ritual and regalia, rather than for tools, weapons, or currency. Golden Kingdoms: Luxury and Legacy in the Ancient Americas will reveal the distinctive ways ancient Americans used not only metals, but also jade, shell, and feathers—materials often considered more valuable than gold. Bringing together newly discovered archaeological finds and masterpieces from major museums in Latin America, Europe, and the United States, this exhibition will cast new light on these ancient civilizations and their place within world history. #GoldenKingdoms https://www.metmuseum.org/exhibitions/listings/2018/golden-kingdoms The exhibition is made possible in part by David Yurman. Additional support is provided by the Sherman Fairchild Foundation, Alice Cary Brown and W.L. Lyons Brown, the Estate of Brooke Astor, the Lacovara Family Endowment Fund, and William R. Rhodes. This exhibition is co-organized by The Metropolitan Museum of Art, the J. Paul Getty Museum, and the Getty Research Institute. Production Credits: Director: Kate Farrell Producer: Melissa Bell Editor: Dia Felix Camera: Sarah Cowan, Stephanie Wuertz Lighting: Dia Felix Production Coordinator: Kaelan Burkett Production Assistants: Bryan Martin, Kimberly Cionca Sebesanu Image Editing/Animation: Bryan Martin Original Music: Austin Fisher Images courtesy of: Clark M. Rodríguez Yukata Yoshii © The Field Museum / Photo: John Weinstein Juan Pablo Murrugarra Villanueva © Dumbarton Oaks, Pre-Columbian Collection, Washington, D.C. © Secretaría de Cultura-INAH. Photo: Martirene Alcantara Christopher B. Donnan Art Resource, NY. © Secretaría de Cultura-INAH / Photo: Michel Zabé Kimbell Art Museum, Fort Worth, Texas Museo Larco, Lima-Perú © Museo Kuntur Wasi / Ministerio de Cultura del Perú Art Resource, NY. © The Trustees of the British Museum © Secretaría de Cultura-INAH. Photo: Jorge Pérez de Lara Fundación Augusto N. Wiese © The Metropolitan Museum of Art Bibliothèque nationale de France © Secretaría de Cultura-INAH. Photo: José Eduardo Novas Viveros Art Resource, NY. © RMN-Grand Palais / Photo: Benôit Touchard © President and Fellows of Harvard College, Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology © Virginia Museum of Fine Arts / Photo: Katherine Wetzel © 2017 Museum of Fine Arts, Boston Courtesy of the Saint Louis Art Museum / Photo: Jean Paul Torno © Secretaría de Cultura-INAH. Archivo Digital de las Colecciones del Museo Nacional de Antropología Courtesy of the Middle American Research Institute, Tulane University © Linden-Museum Stuttgart / Photo: Anatol Dreyer Art Resource, NY. © Museo Nacional del Prado © 2018 The Metropolitan Museum of Art
Views: 4843 The Met
The Cloisters Museum and Gardens: Behind the Scenes with the Director
 
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Learn more about The Cloisters Museum & Gardens: http://www.metmuseum.org/cloisters/ Metropolitan Museum of Art Director Thomas P. Campbell explores the masterpieces, gardens, history, and architecture of The Cloisters Museum and Gardens with Peter Barnet, Curator in Charge of Medieval Art and The Cloisters. Producer and Director: Christopher Noey Editor: Jessica Glass Camera: Wayne De La Roche, Jessica Glass Sound: David Raymond Production Assistance: Kate Farrell, Sarah Cowan, Travis Kray
Views: 32966 The Met
Dressing in Steel:  Part Two
 
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In the second part of this January 21, 2012 program, Armor Jeffrey D. Wasson demonstrates how people dressed in armor. While the process requires an assistant, the armor's careful design allows for a wide variety of movement, even when fully dressed. Narrated by Dirk Breiding, Assistant Curator, Arms and Armor Department, The Metropolitan Museum of Art.
Views: 96013 The Met
Ettore Sottsass: Design Radical
 
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A preview of the exhibition Ettore Sottsass: Design Radical, on view at The Met Breuer from July 21 through October 8, 2017. Featuring Christian Larsen, Associate Curator, Modern Decorative Arts and Design, The Met A seminal figure in 20th-century design, the Italian architect and designer Ettore Sottsass (1917–2007) created a vast body of work, the result of an exceptionally productive career that spanned more than six decades. This exhibition will reevaluate Sottsass's career in a presentation of key works in a range of media—including architectural drawings, interiors, furniture, machines, ceramics, glass, jewelry, textiles and pattern, painting, and photography, in dialogue with ancient and contemporaneous objects that inspired him, as well as his influence on designers working today. #Sottsass #MetBreuer Production Credits Director: Kate Farrell Producer: Melissa Bell Editor: Dia Felix Camera: Sarah Cowan, Stephanie Wuertz Lighting: Dia Felix Production Coordinator: Kaelan Burkett Original Music: Austin Fisher Artwork: © Ettore Sottsass Images and photographs courtesy of: Santi Caleca Christie’s Images Limited 2017 Galleria Giustini Stagetti © Bruno Gecchelin 1974 Getty Images / Handout Erik and Petra Hesmerg photography for the Mourmans Gallery Abet Laminati Memphis Milano Associazione Archivio Storico Olivetti Barbara Radice © The Museum of Modern Art / Licensed by SCALA / Art Resource, NY Photography by Christopher Burke Studio Nathalie du Pasquier Studio Azzuro Studio Ettore Sottsass Srl Dennis Zanone
Views: 3624 The Met
The Artist Project: Wayne Thiebaud
 
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Wayne Thiebaud on Rosa Bonheur's "The Horse Fair" "You really can identify and walk up to those horses because the space is so valid." The Artist Project is an online series in which artists respond to works of art in The Met’s encyclopedic collection. Now available as a book published by Phaidon in cooperation with The Metropolitan Museum of Art. Purchase a copy: http://store.metmuseum.org/art-history+reference/the-artist-project-what-artists-see-when-they-look-at-art/invt/80037399 http://www.metmuseum.org/ArtistProject/wayne-thiebaud
Views: 4209 The Met
The Department of Scientific Research at The Metropolitan Museum of Art
 
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Marco Leona, David H. Koch Scientist in Charge, Department of Scientific Research Mark B. Abbe, research fellow, The Metropolitan Museum of Art Recorded in 2007 See the Heilbrunn Timeline of Art History to Learn more about Painted Funerary Monuments: http://www.metmuseum.org/toah/hd/pfmh/hd_pfmh.htm Scientist Marco Leona discusses the role of scientific research in the preservation and conservation of the works of art in the Museum's permanent collection through a case study in which he and research fellow Mark Abbe examine a Hellenistic funerary stele that is more than two thousand years old. See the Heilbrunn Timeline of Art History to learn more about the Hellenistic funerary stele featured in this video. http://www.metmuseum.org/toah/hd/pfmh/ho_04.17.2.htm Directed by Christopher Noey. Director of Photography: Wayne de La Roche; Editors: Jessica Glass and Kate Farrell; Producer: Terry Russo; Gaffer: Ned Hallick; Sound: Tom Myers; Production Assistant: Chinyang Wong; Archivist: Robin Schwalb.
Views: 8804 The Met

Pubg Forums Xbox Can Be Fun for Everyone

Pubg Forums Xbox - Dead or Alive?

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Pubg Forums Xbox Can Be Fun for Everyone

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The Death of Pubg Forums Xbox

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