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The Known Universe by AMNH
 
06:31
The Known Universe takes viewers from the Himalayas through our atmosphere and the inky black of space to the afterglow of the Big Bang. Every star, planet, and quasar seen in the film is possible because of the world's most complete four-dimensional map of the universe, the Digital Universe Atlas that is maintained and updated by astrophysicists at the American Museum of Natural History. The new film, created by the Museum, is part of an exhibition, Visions of the Cosmos: From the Milky Ocean to an Evolving Universe, at the Rubin Museum of Art in Manhattan through May 2010. Data: Digital Universe, American Museum of Natural History http://www.haydenplanetarium.org/universe/ Visualization Software: Uniview by SCISS Director: Carter Emmart Curator: Ben R. Oppenheimer Producer: Michael Hoffman Executive Producer: Ro Kinzler Co-Executive Producer: Martin Brauen Manager, Digital Universe Atlas: Brian Abbott Music: Suke Cerulo For more information visit http://www.amnh.org
Human Population Through Time
 
06:25
It took 200,000 years for our human population to reach 1 billion—and only 200 years to reach 7 billion. But growth has begun slowing, as women have fewer babies on average. When will our global population peak? And how can we minimize our impact on Earth’s resources, even as we approach 11 billion? Download the video in HD: http://media.amnh.org/sciencebulletins/AMNH_HumanPopulation_DOWNLOAD.mp4 Related content: Population Connection http://worldpopulationhistory.org/map/1/mercator/1/0/25/ UN World Population Prospects https://esa.un.org/unpd/wpp/ Real-time population counter http://www.worldometers.info/world-population/ NASA EarthData https://earthdata.nasa.gov NASA Socioeconomic Data and Applications Center http://sedac.ciesin.columbia.edu Video credits: Writer/Producer AMNH/L. Moustakerski Animator AMNH/S. Krasinski Sound Design AMNH/J. Morfoot Scientific Advisors AMNH/S. Macey AMNH/J. Zichello Center for Biodiversity and Conservation Images PhyloPic David Hillis, Derrick Zwickl, and Robin Gutell, University of Texas World Population used courtesy of Population Connection, ©2015 Other Population Data Sources Population Connection United Nations, “World Population Prospects: 2015 Revision” US Census Bureau Maps and Event Sources Encyclopedia Britannica Inner Asian & Uralic National Resource Center NASA NOAA Needham, J. Science and Civilisation in China TimeMaps Trans-Atlantic Slave Trade Database *** Subscribe to our channel: http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=AMNHOrg Check out our full video catalog: ‪http://www.youtube.com/user/AMNHorg‬‬‬‬ ‬‬ Facebook: ‪http://fb.com/naturalhistory‬‬‬‬‬‬ Twitter: ‪http://twitter.com/amnh‬‬‬‬‬‬ Tumblr: ‪http://amnhnyc.tumblr.com/‬‬‬‬‬‬ Instagram: ‪http://instagram.com/amnh‬‬‬‬‬‬ This video and all media incorporated herein (including text, images, and audio) are the property of the American Museum of Natural History or its licensors, all rights reserved. The Museum has made this video available for your personal, educational use. You may not use this video, or any part of it, for commercial purposes, nor may you reproduce, distribute, publish, prepare derivative works from, or publicly display it without the prior written consent of the Museum. © American Museum of Natural History, New York, NY
Meet the Titanosaur
 
03:00
Measuring 122 feet, the Museum's new exhibit, The Titanosaur, is big--so big that its head extends outside of the Museum's fourth-floor gallery where it is now on permanent display. This species of dinosaur, a giant herbivore that belongs to a group known as titanosaurs, is so new that it has not yet been formally named by the paleontologists who discovered it. The Titanosaur lived in the forests of today’s Patagonia about 100 to 95 million years ago, during the Late Cretaceous period, and weighed 70 tons. It is one of the largest dinosaurs ever discovered. The fossils on which this cast is based were excavated in the Patagonian desert region of Argentina by a team from the Museo Paleontologico Egidio Feruglio led by José Luis Carballido and Diego Pol, who received his Ph.D. at the American Museum of Natural History. In this video, Dr. Mark Norell, chair and Macaulay Curator in the Division of Paleontology, describes how such a massive animal could have supported its own weight and why the Titanosaur is one of the more spectacular finds during what he describes as "the golden age of paleontology." Learn more about the Titanosaur: http://www.amnh.org/exhibitions/the-titanosaur Generous Support for the Titanosaur exhibit has been provided by the Susan S. and Kenneth L. Wallach Foundation. VIDEO CREDITS: VIDEO AMNH/J. Bauerle AMNH/D. Seligman AMNH/L. Stevens AMNH/B. Tudhope AMNH/A. Watanabe Andrei Porzhezhinskii/ Shutterstock Rekindle Photo and Video/Shutterstock Footage from "Raising the Dinosaur Giant" courtesy of BBC, PBS and Thirteen Productions LLC. PHOTOGRAPHY AMNH/D. Finnin Dr. Alberto Garrido Peter May Dr. Alejandro Otero MUSIC “Written in the Stars” by Scott Reinwand/ Warner Chappell Production Music “Innovating the Future” by Stephen Anderson/ Warner Chappell Production Music “Broken Bones” by Geoff Smith/ Warner Chappell Production Music
Preserving Lonesome George
 
04:35
Museum scientists and a master taxidermist describe the painstaking process—part art, part science--of preserving Lonesome George, the famous Pinta Island tortoise who died in 2012 in the Galapagos Islands. As the last known survivor of the tortoise species Chelonoidis abingdoni, Lonesome George served as a global icon of conservation—and a reminder of the urgent need to address ever-increasing extinctions. After a limited time on view at the Museum Lonesome George returns to Ecuador as part of that nation’s patrimony. The Lonesome George exhibit is on view in the Astor Turret on the Museum's fourth floor from September 19, 2014, through January 4, 2015. Learn more about the exhibition: http://www.amnh.org/exhibitions/current-exhibitions/lonesome-george VIDEO CREDITS MUSIC “Indigo” by Guillermo De La Barreda, Tomas Jacobi, and Nicholas Berry/ Warner Chappell Production Music “Early Fog Lifter” by Ken Lewis, Scott Dente and Matt Stanfield/ Warner Chappell Production Music “Viaje Por Carretera” by Alex Wilson/ Warner Chappell Production Music “Moving South” by Alexander Salter/ Warner Chappell Production Music TITLE SEQUENCE Alberto Ludena ILLUSTRATIONS George A. Dante, Jr. Roelant Savery PHOTOGRAPHY AMNH/C. Chesek AMNH/D. Finnin AMNH/R. Mickens Ole Hamann Alizon Llerena Pete Oxford/Minden Pictures/Corbis Galapagos Conservancy Galapagos National Park James Gibbs Charles Shelby VIDEO AMNH/J. Bauerle AMNH/E. Chapman AMNH/L. Stevens Galapagos Digital.com/Miguel Alvear EXHIBITION Lonesome George is presented in collaboration with the Galapagos National Park Directorate and Galapagos Conservancy. SPANISH TRANSLATION Courtesy of Cecilia Alvear
Tornado Alley IMAX Trailer
 
01:53
Traversing the "severe weather capital of the world," Tornado Alley documents two unprecedented missions to encounter one of Earth's most awe-inspiring events: the birth of a tornado. This science adventure reveals the beauty and the power of some of our planet's most extreme—and least understood—weather phenomena. Opens July 4, 2011 at American Museum of Natural History.
Neil deGrasse Tyson On Manhattanhenge
 
03:50
**Note: The dates in this video apply to 2013. For 2016, Mahattanhenge occurs on Sunday, May 29 (Half Sun on grid), Monday, May 30 (Full Sun on grid), Monday, July 11 (Full Sun on grid), and Tuesday, July 12 (Half Sun on grid). Four evenings a year, the brick, steel, and asphalt of Manhattan's cityscape take part in a unique alignment of metropolis and cosmos. The rays of the setting sun align perfectly with Manhattan's street grid—framed by skyscrapers and creating a breathtaking wash of illumination along the cross streets. Frederick P. Rose Hayden Planetarium Director Neil deGrasse Tyson first noted the phenomenon more than a decade ago and coined the term "Manhattanhenge." In this video, Tyson discusses how he came up with the name and what future anthropologists might make of New York City's serendipitous alignment with the sun. To discover the best spots and times for 2015 Manhattanhenge viewing, and get more details about the phenomenon from Neil deGrasse Tyson, visit: http://www.amnh.org/our-research/hayden-planetarium/resources/manhattanhenge
Science Bulletins: Keeling's Curve – The Story of CO2
 
03:38
As the leading greenhouse gas, carbon dioxide is one of the atmosphere’s most closely watched ingredients. The scrutiny began in 1958, when a young geochemist named Charles Keeling began regularly measuring CO2 atop a massive Hawaiian volcano—and discovered some intriguing patterns. For a Google+ Hangout with the scientists behind this visualization, educational resources, and more, visit Keeling’s Curve: The Story of CO2 on the Science Bulletins website: http://www.amnh.org/explore/science-bulletins/(watch)/earth/visualizations/keeling-s-curve-the-story-of-co2 Science Bulletins is a production of the National Center for Science Literacy, Education, and Technology (NCSLET), part of the Department of Education at the American Museum of Natural History. This visualization was supported by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA).
Science Bulletins: Attachment Theory—Understanding the Essential Bond
 
08:22
In 1958, psychologist John Bowlby pioneered "attachment theory," the idea that the early bond between parent and child is critical to a child's emotional development. Since then, scientists have discovered that insecure attachment during formative years can significantly stress both the developing brain and body, resulting in long-term psychological and physical ailments. For example, low levels of attachment security have been linked to diminished levels of cortisol, a steroidal hormone released in response to stress that is critical in reducing inflammation in the body. Watch the latest Human Feature from the Museum's Science Bulletins program to see how recent studies are using cortisol levels as a marker to determine the success of early intervention in building stronger attachments between struggling parents and children. Visitors to AMNH may view the video in the Hall of Human Origins until January 2, 2012. Science Bulletins is a production of the National Center for Science Literacy, Education, and Technology (NCSLET), part of the Department of Education at the American Museum of Natural History. Find out more about Science Bulletins at amnh.org/sciencebulletins/.
The Amazing Shapes of Ammonites
 
03:14
Happy Cephalopod Week! When you think of an ammonite, you probably think of a spiral-shelled sea creature. But in fact, this was just one of the many shapes that ammonites took. Museum Curator Neil Landman explains how this array of shapes once confounded evolutionary biologists, and why this variety is actually a good example of how evolution works. Cephalopod Week is the annual celebration of all things tentacled. Learn more at sciencefriday.com/cephalopodweek and cephalopodweek.tumblr.com *** Subscribe to our channel: http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=amnhorg Check out our full video catalog: http://www.youtube.com/user/AMNHorg Facebook: http://fb.com/naturalhistory Twitter: http://twitter.com/amnh Tumblr: http://amnhnyc.tumblr.com/ Instagram: http://instagram.com/amnh *** This video and all media incorporated herein (including text, images, and audio) are the property of the American Museum of Natural History or its licensors, all rights reserved. The Museum has made this video available for your personal, educational use. You may not use this video, or any part of it, for commercial purposes, nor may you reproduce, distribute, publish, prepare derivative works from, or publicly display it without the prior written consent of the Museum. © American Museum of Natural History, New York, NY
The Covert World of Fish Biofluorescence
 
04:44
A team of researchers led by scientists from the American Museum of Natural History has released the first report of widespread biofluorescence in the tree of life of fishes, identifying more than 180 species that glow in a wide range of colors and patterns. The research shows that biofluorescence—a phenomenon by which organisms absorb light, transform it, and eject it as a different color—is common and variable among marine fish species, indicating its potential use in communication and mating. The report opens the door for the discovery of new fluorescent proteins that could be used in biomedical research. While conducting their research, the team embarked on high-tech expeditions to tropical waters. The most recent expedition was The Explore21 Solomon Islands Expedition, the first trip under a new Museum initiative that supports exploratory fieldwork that is multidisciplinary and heavily integrated with emerging technologies. From the research vessel Alucia the scientists conducted technical scuba dives and descended in a three-person submersible to examine deep coral reef biofluorescence down to 1,000 meters. They also submitted the scientific paper while aboard. To learn more about this study, visit amnh.org. MUSIC "Snowball by Moby "Secret Garden" by Paul Wheatley/ Warner Chappell Production Music SOUND EFFECTS carroll27 melissapons ANIMATION AMNH/Department of Exhibition Wayne Decatur Movie S1 from Chen Y, Tsai M, Yang T, Ku A, Huang K, Huang C, Chou F, Fan H, Hong J, Yen S, Wang W, Lin C, Hsu Y, Su K, Su I, Jang C, Behringer R, Favaro R, Nicolis S, Chien C, Lin S, Yu I (2012) Movie S1 from Yu H, Serebryannyy L, Fry M, Greene M, Chernaya O, Hu W, Chew T, Mahmud N, Kadkol S, Glover S, Prins G, Strakova Z, de Lanerolle P (2013) Video S4 from Egawa R, Hososhima S, Hou X, Katow H, Ishizuka T, Nakamura H, Yawo H (2013) PHOTOGRAPHY Ken Corben David Gruber Jim Hellemn Dawn Roje Robert Schelly John Sparks VIDEO AMNH/J. Bauerle Ken Corben Wade Fairley David Gruber John Sparks Vincent Pieribone
What Is a Pterosaur?
 
01:50
Neither birds nor bats, pterosaurs were reptiles, close cousins of dinosaurs who evolved on a separate branch of the reptile family tree. They were also the first animals after insects to evolve powered flight—not just leaping or gliding, but flapping their wings to generate lift and travel through the air. They evolved into dozens of species. Some were as large as an F-16 fighter jet, and others as small as a paper airplane. Pterosaurs: Flight in the Age of Dinosaurs is on view from April 5, 2014, through January 4, 2015. Learn more about the exhibition at http://www.amnh.org/pterosaurs. Episode 1: What Is a Pterosaur? http://youtu.be/VCr1aZ3AAwo Episode 2: Why Are Pterosaur Fossils So Rare? http://youtu.be/M-5C5R0zajI Episode 3: Why Did Pterosaurs Have Crests? http://youtu.be/HlxAxJnJe4I Episode 4: How are Pterosaur Names Pronounced? http://youtu.be/JKPYDGKdEzY Episode 5: How Were Pterosaurs Adapted for Flight? http://youtu.be/erwczioi9us Episode 6: Meet the Paleontologists http://youtu.be/1VukMb4yk5M *** Subscribe to our channel: http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=AMNHorg Check out our full video catalog: http://www.youtube.com/user/AMNHorg Facebook: http://fb.com/naturalhistory Twitter: http://twitter.com/amnh Tumblr: http://amnhnyc.tumblr.com/ Instagram: http://instagram.com/amnh *** VIDEO CREDITS: Music: "Spring Equinox" by Benjamin Vella and Barney Freeman/ Warner Chappell Production Music Sound Effects: Ian Slattery Illustration: ©AMNH 2014 AMNH/Department of Exhibition Ed Heck Photography: AMNH/C. Chesek AMNH/D. Finan Courtesy of Natural History Museum of Utah, UMNH.VP.23756 Video: AMNH/Department of Exhibition AMNH/J. Bauerle and B. Tudhope
Rare Spider Silk on Exhibit at AMNH
 
03:29
A spectacular and extremely rare textile, woven from golden-colored silk thread produced by more than one million spiders in Madagascar is now on display at the American Museum of Natural History in the Grand Gallery. Drawing on the legacy of a French missionary, Jacob Paul Camboué, this contemporary textile measures 11 feet by 4 feet and took four years to make using a painstaking technique. Hear from Dr. Ian Tattersall, Curator, Division of Anthropology at AMNH, as well as Nicholas Godley, co-creator and owner of the silk along with his partner Simon Peers as they discuss this rare work. For more information visit http://www.amnh.org Produced/Edited by James Sims.
Science Bulletins: Mapping Emotions in the Body
 
02:24
Feelings are often associated with physical reactions: terror can send chills down your spine, and love can leave you weak in the knees. A recent study has linked specific emotions to physical sensations. Researchers tested emotional responses in hundreds of subjects and then created maps identifying locations in the body where emotions cause physical changes. Science Bulletins is a production of the National Center for Science Literacy, Education, and Technology (NCSLET), part of the Department of Education at the American Museum of Natural History. RELATED LINKS PNAS: Bodily maps of emotions http://www.pnas.org/content/early/2013/12/26/1321664111.full.pdf Turku PET Centre http://www.turkupetcentre.fi/index.php University of Tampere: Human Information Processing Laboratory http://www.uta.fi/yky/en/research/hip.html AMNH: Your Emotional Brain http://www.amnh.org/exhibitions/past-exhibitions/brain-the-inside-story/your-emotional-brain
Skylight: The Big Dipper Through Time
 
02:34
Stars aren’t still--they move through space. Our Sun and the seven stars that form the Big Dipper in the constellation Ursa Major all orbit the center of the Milky Way at different speeds. So why do today’s constellations closely resemble those depicted by ancient astronomers? Find out why they, like us, saw just a snapshot of cosmic time. For a visual cue transcript, visit: http://www.amnh.org/our-research/hayden-planetarium/blog/the-big-dipper-through-time © American Museum of Natural History, New York, NY #stars #constellations #astronomy #amnh #americanmuseumofnaturalhistory #milkyway #UrsaMajor #BigDipper
Barnum Brown: The Man Who Discovered Tyrannosaurus rex
 
03:54
Known as the greatest dinosaur collector of all time, Barnum Brown helped the American Museum of Natural History establish its world-class fossil collection. Museum Research Associate Lowell Dingus and Chair of the Division of Paleontology Mark Norell recently traced Brown's extraordinary career from a frontier farm to the world's top fossil sites to the halls of the Museum in the book Barnum Brown: The Man Who Discovered Tyrannosaurus Rex. For more information visit http://www.amnh.org Produced by James Sims & Jill Bauerle Edited by Jill Bauerle
Exploring the Dark Universe: Cosmic Microwave Background
 
04:53
DARK UNIVERSE, the new Hayden Planetarium Space Show now open at the American Museum of Natural History, is produced by an acclaimed team that includes astrophysicist and curator Mordecai-Mark Mac Low. Here, Dr. Mac Low discusses cosmic microwave background - energy left over from the Big Bang that provides a "baby picture of the universe." DARK UNIVERSE celebrates the pivotal discoveries that have led us to greater knowledge of the structure and history of the universe and our place in it—and to new frontiers for exploration. The Space Show is narrated by astrophysicist Neil deGrasse Tyson. For more information, visit: http://www.amnh.org/dark-universe. DARK UNIVERSE was created by the American Museum of Natural History, the Frederick Phineas and Sandra Priest Rose Center for Earth and Space, and the Hayden Planetarium. Made possible through the generous sponsorship of ACCENTURE. And proudly supported by CON EDISON. The Museum also gratefully acknowledges major funding from the Charles Hayden Foundation. Presented with special thanks to NASA and the National Science Foundation. DARK UNIVERSE was developed by the American Museum of Natural History, New York (www.amnh.org), in collaboration with the California Academy of Sciences, San Francisco and GOTO INC, Tokyo, Japan. Episode 1: Exploring the Dark Universe: Dark Matter http://youtu.be/nqdDRpUrrdI Episode 2: Exploring the Dark Universe: Dark Energy http://youtu.be/P8wRDGEl4F8 Episode 3: Exploring the Dark Universe: Cosmic Microwave Background http://youtu.be/1kqWWLpyMpY *** Subscribe to our channel: http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=AMNHorg Check out our full video catalog: http://www.youtube.com/user/AMNHorg Facebook: http://fb.com/naturalhistory Twitter: http://twitter.com/amnh Tumblr: http://amnhnyc.tumblr.com/ Instagram: http://instagram.com/amnh ***
Niles Eldredge: Trilobites and Punctuated Equilibria
 
04:46
In the late 1960s, Curator Emeritus Niles Eldredge was a graduate student with a passion for trilobite eyes. He had been taught to expect slow and steady change between the specimens of these Devonian arthropods he collected for his dissertation. Only his trilobites were doing one of two things: staying the same, or evolving in leaps. Several years later, Eldredge, along with co-author Stephen Jay Gould, turned his observations into a theory known as “punctuated equilibria”: the idea that species stay relatively the same, or at equilibrium, throughout the fossil record save for rare bursts of evolutionary change. A former Chairman and Curator of Paleontology at the American Museum of Natural History, Eldredge remains at the hub of evolutionary discussion and debate, as well as one of the world's experts on trilobites, specializing in mid-Paleozoic phacopids. He has also analyzed the relationship between global extinctions of the geologic past and the present-day biodiversity crisis, as well as the general relationship between extinction and evolution. Learn more about Trilobites: http://www.amnh.org/our-research/paleontology/faq/trilobite-website VIDEO CREDITS: VIDEO: AMNH/J. Bauerle PHOTOGRAPHY: Niles Eldredge AMNH/D. Finnin AMNH/S. Thurston Courtesy of Euan Clarkson Courtesy Archives of Michigan Nicole Bechard Ashley Dace JJ Harrison Andy Secher Martin A. Shugar ILLUSTRATION AMNH/Niles Eldredge Northern Arizona University/Ron Blakey The University of Edinburgh/ Euan Clarkson MUSIC: “Gleaming” by Aaron Ashton/Warner Chappell Production Music “Innovative Technologies” by Kriso Lindberg/Warner Chappell Production Music “Squaring the Circle” by Lars Kurz/Warner Chappell Production Music SOUND EFFECTS Freesound/Digifishmusic, exuberate, hanstimm, timgormley, toiletrolltube, UCL Sound SPECIAL THANKS Niles Eldredge Andy Secher Martin A. Shugar
Recoloring the Animals in the Dioramas
 
05:09
Fluorescent lighting, embraced by diorama artists in the 1940s for its cool, blue-sky effect, eventually caused animal skins to fade, bleaching dark fur blond. To restore scientific accuracy, conservators searched for a just-right colorant that was light-stable, reversible or retreatable, and that wouldn't clump, mat, or bind the fur. The solution was a series of carefully mixed shades of a commercial dye. The restored Hall of North American Mammals reopened October 2012. CREDITS: PHOTOGRAPHY AMNH/Conservation Department VIDEO AMNH/J. Bauerle AMNH/J. Reynolds S. Sfarra *** Subscribe to our channel: http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=AMNHorg Check out our full video catalog: http://www.youtube.com/user/AMNHorg Facebook: http://fb.com/naturalhistory Twitter: http://twitter.com/amnh Tumblr: http://amnhnyc.tumblr.com/ Instagram: http://instagram.com/amnh ***
Transformation: Dinosaurs to Birds
 
03:27
This spellbinding animation from the Museum’s new exhibition “Dinosaurs Among Us” traces the evolutionary transition from dinosaurs to birds. Learn more about “Dinosaurs Among Us”: http://www.amnh.org/exhibitions/dinosaurs-among-us Based on recent scientific research that examines fossils using new technologies, the transformation story unfolds as low-polygonal silhouettes of dinosaurs morph from ground-dwelling animals into flight-capable birds. The mass extinction that erased most dinosaurs 65 million years ago left a few bird lineages unscathed. Within only 15 million years all of our familiar bird groups were flourishing. These extraordinary living dinosaurs provide a vivid link to the ancient past. The Museum’s new exhibition, “Dinosaurs Among Us,” explores the continuities between living dinosaurs—birds—and their extinct ancestors, showcasing remarkable new evidence for what scientists now call one of the best-documented evolutionary transitions in the history of life. The Museum gratefully acknowledges the Richard and Karen LeFrak Exhibition and Education Fund. Dinosaurs Among Us is proudly supported by Chase Private Client. Additional support is generously provided by Dana and Virginia Randt. VIDEO CREDITS: EXECUTIVE PRODUCER Hélène Alonso DIRECTOR/ANIMATION Bob Peterson WRITER JoAnn Gutin PROJECT MANAGER Sarah Galloway MUSIC Audio Network US, Inc. RESEARCH Joe Levit SPECIAL THANKS Ashley Heers Eozin Che
Science Bulletins: Space Weather—Storms from the Sun
 
06:11
Once upon a time, back in the twentieth century, the weather was straightforward: it rained or snowed, skies were sunny or cloudy. However, in the twenty-first century—the era of globalization and digitalization—a whole new kind weather is critical to consider: space weather. Space weather is direct product of our local star, the Sun. The Sun continuously sheds its skin, blowing a fierce wind of charged particles in all directions, including Earth's. From time to time, storms on the Sun's surface—solar flares, coronal mass ejections—toss off added masses of energy and ions. When that turbulence slams into Earth, it produces space weather. The consequences can be spectacular, from colorful auroras to satellite, power and communications failures. Space weather isn't new: the Sun has buffeted Earth with solar particles since the planet first formed. What has changed is society. This feature reveals how our increasing use of satellite technology has made us vulnerable to solar storms, and how solar scientists—"space weathermen"—are learning how to predict and forecast the Sun's activity. Science Bulletins is a production of the National Center for Science Literacy, Education, and Technology (NCSLET), part of the Department of Education at the American Museum of Natural History. Find out more about Science Bulletins at http://www.amnh.org/sciencebulletins/. Related Links The Sun-Earth Connection: Heliophysics Solar Storm and Space Weather http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/sunearth/spaceweather/index.html NASA Science: Magnetospheres http://science.nasa.gov/heliophysics/focus-areas/magnetosphere-ionosphere/ Classifying Solar Eruptions http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/sunearth/news/classify-flares.html Solar and Heliospheric Observatory http://sohowww.nascom.nasa.gov/home.html
Inside the Collections: Ichthyology at AMNH
 
02:30
In the first of a new series of behind-the-scenes looks at the collections at the American Museum of Natural History, Melanie Stiassny, Axelrod Research Curator in the Department of Ichthyology, takes us through the Museum's vast collection of fishes. The Department of Ichthyology, one of the four departments within the Museum's Division of Vertebrate Zoology, houses a collection that comprises more than 2 million specimens from around the world, with a special focus on African, Australian, Central American, Chinese, and Malagasy fresh water fishes as well as Bahamian and Gulf of Mexican shore fishes. The department's three curators, as well as postdoctoral fellows, students and staff, regularly conduct fieldwork to add to these collections. Stiassny has carried out studies throughout the world's tropical waters to research the evolution, behavior, and conservation of fishes and has played an active role in raising public awareness of the biodiversity and conservation crisis. Her current projects include an exploration, sponsored by the National Science Foundation, of the freshwater fishes and mussels of the Congo. Produced/edited by James Sims. For more information visit http://www.amnh.org
Earth Day 1970 – 2017: What’s Changed?
 
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The first Earth Day was in 1970. What’s changed since? Our population has doubled. We’re emitting 2.4 times more CO2. Sea levels have risen 4 inches. But the world has also changed for the better. See how our actions since 1970 have added up. For details about the Museum's Earth Day programming and to RSVP for the Earth Day Kickoff, please visit http://www.amnh.org/calendar/earth-day-at-the-museum VIDEO CREDITS Executive Producer AMNH/V. Trakinski Writer/Producer AMNH/L. Moustakerski Animator AMNH/S. Krasinski Sound Design AMNH/J. Morfoot Scientific Advisors AMNH/A. Porzecanski Center for Biodiversity and Conservation DATA SOURCES CSIRO Endangered Species International EPA, America’s Children and the Environment, 2015 EPA, Our Nation’s Air: Trends Through 2015 Global Carbon Atlas IPCC, Climate Change 2014 Synthesis Report, 5th Assessment IUCN Red List NASA NOAA UN Environment Programme, Ozone Secretariat UN Food and Agriculture Organization UN, World Population Prospects: The 2015 Revision US Fish & Wildlife Service van Dijk, A., et al., “Skin cancer risks avoided by the Montreal Protocol,” Photochemistry and Photobiology, 2012 WWF, Living Planet Report 2016
Science Bulletins: Evolution in Action—Isolation and Speciation in the Lower Congo Region
 
09:19
Central Africa's roiling, rapid Lower Congo River is home to an extraordinary assortment of fish—many truly bizarre. This new video by Science Bulletins, the American Museum of Natural Historys current-science video program, features Museum scientists on a quest to understand why so many species have evolved here. Follow Curator of Ichthyology Melanie Stiassny and her team as they search the Lower Congo Rivers mysterious depths for an evolutionary driver. For more information visit http://www.amnh.org
Science Bulletins: Whales Give Dolphins a Lift
 
01:52
Many species interact in the wild, most often as predator and prey. But recent encounters between humpback whales and bottlenose dolphins reveal a playful side to interspecies interaction. In two different locations in Hawaii, scientists watched as dolphins "rode" the heads of whales: the whales lifted the dolphins up and out of the water, and then the dolphins slid back down. The two species seemed to cooperate in the activity, and neither displayed signs of aggression or distress. Whales and dolphins in Hawaiian waters often interact, but playful social activity such as this is extremely rare between species. The latest Bio Bulletin from the Museum's Science Bulletins program presents the first recorded examples of this type of behavior. Visitors to AMNH may view the video in the Hall of Biodiversity until February 9, 2012. Science Bulletins is a production of the National Center for Science Literacy, Education, and Technology (NCSLET), part of the Department of Education at the American Museum of Natural History. Find out more about Science Bulletins at http://www.amnh.org/sciencebulletins/. Related Links: Two Unusual Interactions Between a Bottlenose Dolphin (Tursiops truncatus) and a Humpback Whale (Megaptera novaeangliae) in Hawaiian Waters http://bit.ly/yaLlSw The Hawaii Association for Marine Education and Research, Inc. http://www.hamerhawaii.com/index.htm National Marine Mammal Foundation http://nmmpfoundation.org/
Voyage of the Giant Squid - Shelf Life #8
 
06:43
Getting a giant squid from New Zealand to New York is no easy feat. Curator Neil Landman tells the tale of a sizable specimen’s journey to the collections at the American Museum of Natural History, and Curator Mark Siddall explains why this giant cephalopod has a new name. For more about other amazing animals that inspired mythological creatures, head over to the episode website: http://www.amnh.org/shelf-life/episode-08-voyage-of-the-giant-squid Shelf Life is a collection for curious minds—opening doors, pulling out drawers, and taking the lids off some of the incredible, rarely seen items in the American Museum of Natural History. Over 12 episodes, Shelf Life will explore topics like specimen preparation, learn why variety is vital, and meet some of the people who work in the Museum collections. For more, visit http://www.amnh.org/ShelfLife Series Trailer https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=A2PmDLfWt1Q Episode 1: 33 Million Things https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5NR-xl7W0vo Episode 2: Turtles and Taxonomy https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XmXqn9AW2Kc Episode 3: Six Ways to Prepare a Coelacanth https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WqL17uabbso Episode 4: Skull of the Olinguito https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OEYfY0mRc5k Episode 5: How To Time Travel To a Star https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=S5xJqFtPGAA Episode 6: The Tiniest Fossils https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JLSa8cGJixQ Episode 7: The Language Detectives https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=92IvcuQF9cg Episode 8: Voyage of the Giant Squid https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=W47by1jPTPw Episode 9: Kinsey’s Wasps https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lHc5l4gQsro Episode 10: The Dinosaurs of Ghost Ranch https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=567bv6xmuss Episode 11: Green Grow the Salamanders https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uV9Z-pHr-nE Episode 12: Six Extinctions In Six Minutes https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AZuwOgcS1W0 *** Subscribe to our channel: http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=AMNHOrg Check out our full video catalog: ‪http://www.youtube.com/user/AMNHorg‬‬‬‬ ‬‬ Facebook: ‪http://fb.com/naturalhistory‬‬‬‬‬‬ Twitter: ‪http://twitter.com/amnh‬‬‬‬‬‬ Tumblr: ‪http://amnhnyc.tumblr.com/‬‬‬‬‬‬ Instagram: ‪http://instagram.com/amnh‬‬‬‬‬‬ This video and all media incorporated herein (including text, images, and audio) are the property of the American Museum of Natural History or its licensors, all rights reserved. The Museum has made this video available for your personal, educational use. You may not use this video, or any part of it, for commercial purposes, nor may you reproduce, distribute, publish, prepare derivative works from, or publicly display it without the prior written consent of the Museum. © American Museum of Natural History, New York, NY
New Dinosaur Research: Microraptor's Feather Color Revealed
 
03:30
A team of American and Chinese researchers, including scientists from the American Museum of Natural History, has revealed the color and detailed feather pattern of Microraptor, a pigeon-sized, four-winged dinosaur that lived about 130 million years ago. By comparing the patterns of pigment-containing organelles from a Microraptor fossil to those in modern birds, the scientists determined that the dinosaur's plumage was iridescent with hues of black and blue like the feathers of a crow. Their results were published by the journal Science in March. "This study gives us an unprecedented glimpse at what this animal looked like when it was alive," said Mark Norell, one of the paper's authors and chair of the Museum's Division of Paleontology. Although its anatomy is very similar to birds, Mircroraptor is considered a non-avian dinosaur and is placed in the family of "running lizards" like Velociraptor. Knowledge about Microraptor's plumage could help scientists zero in on the evolutionary transition from non-avian dinosaurs to birds. The research also shows that Microraptor's tail fan, which was once thought to be a broad, teardrop-shaped surface meant to help with flight, is actually much narrower with two protruding feathers likely evolved for social interactions. This new finding suggests the importance of display in the early evolution of feathers.
Distant Quasars: Shedding Light on Black Holes
 
08:21
How can scientists study a faraway black hole that emits no light? By observing its quasar. As objects get pulled onto the accretion disk orbiting a supermassive black hole, friction creates a bright light known as a quasar. In this video, researchers use a “galaxy-sized lens” to analyze light from a distant quasar—revealing a supermassive black hole with a truly voracious appetite.
Rare Fossils of Ancient Trilobites
 
02:45
Trilobites appeared in ancient oceans well before life emerged on land. These marine arthropods existed for almost 300 million years, and over 20,000 species have been described so far. In this video, Museum Curator Neil Landman and Field Associates Andy Secher and Martin Shugar discuss trilobites, their unique features, and how fossils are collected and prepared while highlighting a new Museum exhibit that features 15 rare and beautiful trilobite fossils from the Museum's collection. Ancient trilobite fossils are now on display in the Museum's Grand Gallery. The exhibit is made possible thanks to Martin Shugar, M.D., and Andy Secher. This video and all media incorporated herein (including text, images, and audio) are the property of the American Museum of Natural History or its licensors, all rights reserved. The Museum has made this video available for your personal, educational use. You may not use this video, or any part of it, for commercial purposes, nor may you reproduce, distribute, publish, prepare derivative works from, or publicly display it without the prior written consent of the Museum. © American Museum of Natural History, New York, NY
Inside the Collections: Paleontology and the Big Bone Room
 
02:31
Paleontology Collections Manager Carl Mehling gives us a behind-the-scenes tour of the Big Bone Room, which houses some of the largest items in the Paleontology collection. Its holdings include one of the largest complete limb bones in the world: the 650-pound thigh bone of the long-necked, plant-eating dinosaur Camarasaurus. Visitors will be able to see this spectacular specimen in the upcoming major exhibition The World's Largest Dinosaurs (April 16, 2011-January 2, 2012), which explores the amazing anatomy of a uniquely super-sized group of dinosaurs, the sauropods. More than 3 million specimens make up the Museum's world-class paleontology collections, and only a small fraction can be displayed at any given time. In fact, only 0.02 percent of the Museum's vertebrate paleontology specimens are on view; the rest are stored behind the scenes, where they continue to be studied by Museum scientists and their colleagues.
Science Bulletins: Sloan Digital Sky Survey—Mapping the Universe
 
06:33
Taking a census of all the luminous objects in one-quarter of the visible cosmos is a hefty accounting job. It takes a specially-built telescope on task every clear night for eight years, wielding one of the biggest digital cameras on the planet. Over a hundred million stars, galaxies, and quasars have been tallied so far. Meet the astronomical observers and theorists set on divining the three-dimensional structure and origins of the Universe from these unprecedented scores of data.
Science Bulletins: Autistic Brains Show Visual Dominance
 
02:02
After examining brain-mapping studies of hundreds of autistic people, scientists from the University of Montreal in Canada and Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston have found distinct patterns that seem to underlie autistics' remarkable visual abilities.
Earth Day 1970 – 2018: Sea Changes
 
04:26
The first Earth Day was in 1970. Since then, our population has doubled. On average, each person is eating more meat, throwing out more plastic, and producing 21% more CO2. Our habits on land are recorded in the oceans. See what’s changed for our oceans since 1970, and how you can take action. Check out our Earth Day playlist here: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLrfcruGtplwH76Sryqpk7nXf0YIEM0piZ This video and all media incorporated herein (including text, images, and audio) are the property of the American Museum of Natural History or its licensors, all rights reserved. The Museum has made this video available for your personal, educational use. You may not use this video, or any part of it, for commercial purposes, nor may you reproduce, distribute, publish, prepare derivative works from, or publicly display it without the prior written consent of the Museum. © American Museum of Natural History, New York, NY
Modeling Animals in Habitat Dioramas
 
02:57
Museum artist Stephen C. Quinn describes the painstaking method used to display specimens in habitat dioramas. Following a method developed by legendary explorer and taxidermist Carl Akeley, Museum artisans used the articulated skeleton of an animal as the base for a meticulously accurate sculpture, based on field measurements. That was then used as the template for a cast from which a lightweight "mannequin" was made. The restored Hall of North American Mammals reopened October 2012. CREDITS: Photography: AMNH Archives AMNH/C. Chesak AMNH/D. Finnin AMNH/R. Mickens Video AMNH/J. Bauerle S. Sfarra *** Subscribe to our channel: http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=AMNHorg Check out our full video catalog: http://www.youtube.com/user/AMNHorg Facebook: http://fb.com/naturalhistory Twitter: http://twitter.com/amnh Tumblr: http://amnhnyc.tumblr.com/ Instagram: http://instagram.com/amnh ***
DARK UNIVERSE Now Playing
 
03:45
DARK UNIVERSE, the new Hayden Planetarium Space Show premiering November 2, 2013, at the American Museum of Natural History, is produced by an acclaimed team that includes astrophysicists and data visualization experts. DARK UNIVERSE celebrates the pivotal discoveries that have led us to greater knowledge of the structure and history of the universe and our place in it—and to new frontiers for exploration. The Space Show is narrated by astrophysicist Neil deGrasse Tyson. For more information, visit http://www.amnh.org/dark-universe. DARK UNIVERSE was created by the American Museum of Natural History, the Frederick Phineas and Sandra Priest Rose Center for Earth and Space, and the Hayden Planetarium. Made possible through the generous sponsorship of ACCENTURE. And proudly supported by CON EDISON. The Museum also gratefully acknowledges major funding from the Charles Hayden Foundation. Presented with special thanks to NASA and the National Science Foundation. DARK UNIVERSE was developed by the American Museum of Natural History, New York (www.amnh.org), in collaboration with the California Academy of Sciences, San Francisco and GOTO INC, Tokyo, Japan.
The Tiniest Fossils - Shelf Life #6
 
06:07
You could easily mistake foraminifera fossils for flecks of dust, but these tiny specimens hold big insights about Earth’s climate. Scientific Assistant Bushra Hussaini, researcher Ellen Thomas, Curator Neil Landman, and intern Shaun Mahmood are preserving this invaluable collection. For more about how fossil organisms reveal the record of a changing Earth, head over to the episode website: http://www.amnh.org/shelf-life/shelf-life-06-the-tiniest-fossils This material is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant No. 1203394. PI: Neil Landman. Co-PI: Ruth O’Leary. The Microfossil Digitization and Rehousing Project team would like to thank volunteer Linda Scalbom. Shelf Life is a collection for curious minds—opening doors, pulling out drawers, and taking the lids off some of the incredible, rarely seen items in the American Museum of Natural History. Over 12 episodes, Shelf Life will explore topics like specimen preparation, learn why variety is vital, and meet some of the people who work in the Museum collections. For more, visit http://www.amnh.org/ShelfLife Series Trailer https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=A2PmDLfWt1Q Episode 1: 33 Million Things https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5NR-xl7W0vo Episode 2: Turtles and Taxonomy https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XmXqn9AW2Kc Episode 3: Six Ways to Prepare a Coelacanth https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WqL17uabbso Episode 4: Skull of the Olinguito https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OEYfY0mRc5k Episode 5: How To Time Travel To a Star https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=S5xJqFtPGAA Episode 6: The Tiniest Fossils https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JLSa8cGJixQ Episode 7: The Language Detectives https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=92IvcuQF9cg Episode 8: Voyage of the Giant Squid https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=W47by1jPTPw Episode 9: Kinsey’s Wasps https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lHc5l4gQsro Episode 10: The Dinosaurs of Ghost Ranch https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=567bv6xmuss Episode 11: Green Grow the Salamanders https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uV9Z-pHr-nE Episode 12: Six Extinctions In Six Minutes https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AZuwOgcS1W0 *** Subscribe to our channel: http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=AMNHOrg Check out our full video catalog: http://www.youtube.com/user/AMNHorg Facebook: http://fb.com/naturalhistory Twitter: http://twitter.com/amnh Tumblr: http://amnhnyc.tumblr.com/ Instagram: http://instagram.com/amnh This video and all media incorporated herein (including text, images, and audio) are the property of the American Museum of Natural History or its licensors, all rights reserved. The Museum has made this video available for your personal, educational use. You may not use this video, or any part of it, for commercial purposes, nor may you reproduce, distribute, publish, prepare derivative works from, or publicly display it without the prior written consent of the Museum. © American Museum of Natural History, New York, NY
The Science Behind De-extinction
 
05:49
Fossils of dinosaurs, mammoths, and saber-toothed cats on display on the Museum's fourth floor are impressive and imposing specimens of animals that once roamed the Earth, then vanished during mass extinctions at the end of the Cretaceous and Pleistocene eras. Elsewhere in the Museum, visitors can see species whose more recent extinctions were caused by human activity, from the Dodo in the Hall of Biodiversity to the Passenger Pigeon, one of North America's most plentiful birds until the early 1900s, featured in the Hall of New York City Birds. In the not-too-distant future, scientists expect that technological breakthroughs—and availability of genetic data from specimens of extinct species—will provide ways to revive vanished species. In this video, Museum Curator Ross MacPhee discusses the science and ethical considerations of "de-extinction."
Preparing Dinosaur Fossils Inside AMNH
 
03:07
Fossil preparators are highly skilled technicians who restore the naturally fractured bones and teeth of fossil to the original state, somewhat like art conservators restore damaged paintings and sculptures. When fossils arrive from the field, they are encased in plaster jackets, and the rock, or matrix, which was deposited around the fossils. Fossil preparation involves cutting open the plaster jacket and removing this matrix surrounding the fossil. The matrix may be soft and crumbly when the sand or mud is poorly cemented together, or it can be extremely hard when the sediments are well-cemented. Accordingly, a wide variety of tools is required to remove the matrix and stabilize the fossil. Commonly, dental tools are used to carefully pick away sediment near the bone, along with custom-made needles composed of carbide steel. Preparators carefully select the materials used to strengthen or repair specimens. Adhesives, glues, and fillers must stand the test of time and not become brittle or discolored, just like the materials used to conserve works of art. The types of materials used are recorded in order to aid future preparators if further preparation or repair is required. Watch as Justy Alicea, a senior preparator at the American Museum of Natural History, works on a specimen and then gives a tour of the Museum's fossil preparation lab. For more information visit http://www.amnh.org Produced/edited by James Sims
The Power of Poison - Venomous vs. Poisonous
 
02:43
This striking new exhibition explores poison's paradoxical roles in nature, human health and history, literature, and myth. Whether as a defense against predators, a source of magical strength, or a lethal weapon used as lifesaving medical treatment, the story of poison is surprising at every turn. Discover the toxic species that live in a remote Colombian forest, where poisons are just one of many tools in organisms' struggles to survive. Learn about a variety of evolutionary strategies that serve animals and plants and see live animals, including a gila monster (Heloderma suspectum), Flame Butterfly Caterpillars (Dryas iulia), and others up close. Find out which familiar tales of illness, enchantment, or death by poison—a feature of countless fairy tales, myths, and legends from around the world—contain kernels of truth. Explore some of history's most intriguing poisoning cases, many of which remain puzzling today. Take part in a live presentation about a real-world poisoning case and key advances in toxicology, or the science of detecting poison. And finally, learn how studying poison's effects on human cells helps scientists figure out how to protect, repair, and heal them. The Power of Poison is on view at the American Museum of Natural History from November 16, 2013, through August 10, 2014. Visit http://www.amnh.org/poison for more information. Major funding has been provided by the LILA WALLACE -- READER'S DIGEST ENDOWMENT FUND.
Why Did Pterosaurs Have Crests?
 
01:57
The incredible diversity of pterosaurs is perhaps best expressed in one of the prehistoric flying reptile's most intriguing and mysterious features: the head crest. Pterosaur crests are thought to have been fairly ubiquitous, appearing in many groups of pterosaurs from the Triassic (252--201 million years ago) through the Jurassic (201--145 million years ago) and Cretaceous (145--66 million years ago) periods. Why did pterosaurs have crests? There are competing theories, chief among them that crests serve as a form of species identification. Other possibilities include a role in sexual selection, heat regulation, as a rudder in flight, or as a keel in the water, stabilizing the reptile as it dove or skimmed for food. Without living descendants for comparison and because pterosaur fossils are so rare, it's impossible to say for sure. Researchers would have to find thousands more fossils in different growth stages to answer the question. Pterosaurs: Flight in the Age of Dinosaurs is on view from April 5, 2014, through January 4, 2015. Learn more about the exhibition at http://www.amnh.org/pterosaurs. Episode 1: What Is a Pterosaur? http://youtu.be/VCr1aZ3AAwo Episode 2: Why Are Pterosaur Fossils So Rare? http://youtu.be/M-5C5R0zajI Episode 3: Why Did Pterosaurs Have Crests? http://youtu.be/HlxAxJnJe4I Episode 4: How are Pterosaur Names Pronounced? http://youtu.be/JKPYDGKdEzY Episode 5: How Were Pterosaurs Adapted for Flight? http://youtu.be/erwczioi9us Episode 6: Meet the Paleontologists http://youtu.be/1VukMb4yk5M *** Subscribe to our channel: http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=AMNHorg Check out our full video catalog: http://www.youtube.com/user/AMNHorg Facebook: http://fb.com/naturalhistory Twitter: http://twitter.com/amnh Tumblr: http://amnhnyc.tumblr.com/ Instagram: http://instagram.com/amnh Episode 1: What Is a Pterosaur? http://youtu.be/VCr1aZ3AAwo Episode 2: Why Are Pterosaur Fossils So Rare? http://youtu.be/M-5C5R0zajI Episode 3: Why Did Pterosaurs Have Crests? http://youtu.be/HlxAxJnJe4I Episode 4: How are Pterosaur Names Pronounced? http://youtu.be/JKPYDGKdEzY Episode 5: How Were Pterosaurs Adapted for Flight? http://youtu.be/erwczioi9us Episode 6: Meet the Paleontologists http://youtu.be/1VukMb4yk5M *** Subscribe to our channel: http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=AMNHorg Check out our full video catalog: http://www.youtube.com/user/AMNHorg Facebook: http://fb.com/naturalhistory Twitter: http://twitter.com/amnh Tumblr: http://amnhnyc.tumblr.com/ Instagram: http://instagram.com/amnh *** VIDEO CREDITS: MUSIC "Red Square" by G. Small and F. Gerard/ Warner Chappell Production Music ILLUSTRATION ©AMNH 2014 ANIMATION AMNH/Exhibition Department PHOTOGRAPHY AMNH/C. Chesek VIDEO AMNH/J. Bauerle
How Did All Dinosaurs Except Birds Go Extinct?
 
01:55
The extinction of non-avian dinosaurs except birds at the end of the Cretaceous has intrigued paleontologists for more than a century. In the 1900s, numerous speculative hypotheses were proposed. One was that dinosaurs just got too big, but the largest dinosaurs, such as Apatosaurus, lived long before the end of the Cretaceous. Then in 1980, Walter and Luis Alvarez discovered that a bed of marine clay in Italy, right at the Cretaceous-Tertiary boundary, contained abnormally high levels of iridium, an element rare in rocks on the Earth's surface but more common in asteroids and comets. Thus, they argued that an asteroid, about 10 km across, impacted the Earth, generating massive tsunamis, with impact debris cutting off sunlight for months, stopping photosynthesis, and causing freezing temperatures. Chemical reactions in the atmosphere caused acid rain and long-term global warming, all of which extinguished non-avian dinosaurs. Rocks from an impact crater called Chicxulub, buried beneath the shore of the Yucatan Peninsula, were dated radioisotopically at 65 million years, right when the extinctions occurred, confirming an impact. However, at the same time, massive lava flows erupted across what is now southwest India. These layers of lava, called the Deccan Traps, are up to 2,400 m thick and cover an area as large as California. They represent the second largest episode of continental volcanism in the Earth's history. The eruptions occurred over a 500,000 year period spanning the end of the Cretaceous, and probably caused many of the same effects as the impact: reduced sunlight, acid rain, short-term cooling, long-term greenhouse warming. Although most scientists believe that the impact represented the final blow for non-avian dinosaurs, the fact that both events occurred when these dinosaurs went extinct suggests that both events, with their similar "killing mechanisms," could well have played a role.
Hiroshi Sugimoto: Four Decades of Photographing Dioramas
 
03:34
The photographer Hiroshi Sugimoto has visited to the Museum four times in the past four decades to shoot his "Dioramas" series, which focuses on habitat displays to explore the distinction between the real and the fictive. What initially surprised Sugimoto about the series was that his photos looked utterly real--as if he were photographing on location, and not in front of a three-dimensional representation of a real location. Part of this effect can be credited to Sugimoto's talent as a photographer, but the effect wouldn't be possible without the skill of the Museum's diorama artists, who blended science and nature to create the illusion of reality. Using the latest technology, they constructed the foreground, taxidermy, and painted background of a diorama to reflect that of the original site. Not lost on Sugimoto is the fact that when Museum preparators made collecting trips to diorama sites, they documented the area with photographs, which they referred to when they went back to the Museum and brought the dioramas to life. "Now I'm re-photographing the diorama, based on the photography," the artist said. "So many layers of transformation--that's very conceptually interesting." During a 2012 shoot of the Olympic Forest diorama in the Hall of North American Forests, Sugimoto explained why he keeps coming back to the Museum. "I have my ideas and visions of what nature should look like. So I'm using this diorama to represent my idealistic visions of nature." Known as "Windows on Nature," the Museum's habitat dioramas are recognized internationally as premier examples of the fusion of art and science. The lifelike displays were created to educate the public about nature and science and also engender feelings of wonder for the natural world. For his latest round of photographs, the artist used his trademark 8 x 10 large-format camera to explore the theme of lost nature, or what the earth would look like if human civilization vanished. The first photographs from the "Dioramas" series, shot in 1976, brought Sugimoto to acclaim. "Dioramas" continues to gain an audience today with recent exhibitions at the J. Paul Getty Museum in Los Angeles and the Pace Gallery in New York. Dioramas seen in this video (in order of appearance):
Nothing But the Tooth - Shelf Life #13
 
05:58
What does it take to describe a new genus, or two, of ancient mammal ancestors? Paleontologists Mike Novacek and Paúl Velazco explain why dental detective work is a big part of the job. For more discoveries in the desert, visit our episode website: http://www.amnh.org/amnh2/shelf-life/discoveries-in-the-desert Check out our 360 video about the early Gobi expeditions: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HDdqd8c_-hY For Shelf Life’s Season 2, pack your bags for adventure. Explore fantastic stories from more than a century of expeditions that helped build the Museum’s 33 million specimens and artifacts—and find out what scientists are still uncovering about them today. For more, visit our series website: http://www.amnh.org/ShelfLife Series Trailer https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=A2PmDLfWt1Q Episode 1: 33 Million Things https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5NR-xl7W0vo Episode 2: Turtles and Taxonomy https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XmXqn9AW2Kc Episode 3: Six Ways to Prepare a Coelacanth https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WqL17uabbso Episode 4: Skull of the Olinguito https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OEYfY0mRc5k Episode 5: How To Time Travel To a Star https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=S5xJqFtPGAA Episode 6: The Tiniest Fossils https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JLSa8cGJixQ Episode 7: The Language Detectives https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=92IvcuQF9cg Episode 8: Voyage of the Giant Squid https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=W47by1jPTPw Episode 9: Kinsey’s Wasps https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lHc5l4gQsro Episode 10: The Dinosaurs of Ghost Ranch https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=567bv6xmuss Episode 11: Green Grow the Salamanders https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uV9Z-pHr-nE Episode 12: Six Extinctions In Six Minutes https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AZuwOgcS1W0 *** Subscribe to our channel: http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=AMNHOrg Check out our full video catalog: ‪http://www.youtube.com/user/AMNHorg‬‬‬‬ ‬‬ Facebook: ‪http://fb.com/naturalhistory‬‬‬‬‬‬ Twitter: ‪http://twitter.com/amnh‬‬‬‬‬‬ Tumblr: ‪http://amnhnyc.tumblr.com/‬‬‬‬‬‬ Instagram: ‪http://instagram.com/amnh‬‬‬‬‬‬ This video and all media incorporated herein (including text, images, and audio) are the property of the American Museum of Natural History or its licensors, all rights reserved. The Museum has made this video available for your personal, educational use. You may not use this video, or any part of it, for commercial purposes, nor may you reproduce, distribute, publish, prepare derivative works from, or publicly display it without the prior written consent of the Museum. © American Museum of Natural History, New York, NY
Natural Histories: Rare Books from the AMNH Library
 
05:00
NATURAL HISTORIES: EXTRAORDINARY RARE BOOK SELECTIONS FROM THE AMERICAN MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY LIBRARY introduces natural science and art lovers alike to a selection of seldom-seen and beautifully illustrated scientific works from the American Museum of Natural History's Rare Book Collection This unique volume, edited by Tom Baione, the Harold Boeschenstein Director of Library services at the Museum, showcases spectacular holdings from the Rare Book Collection, with 40 essays from Museum scientists including Hayden Planetarium Director Neil deGrasse Tyson, paleontologist Niles Eldredge, Center for Biodiversity and Conservation Director Eleanor Sterling, and Museum curators, scientific associates, and librarians who are familiar with the works and have used them in their research. The works featured in NATURAL HISTORIES span from the 16th century to the early 20th century, with scientific disciplines ranging from anthropology to astronomy to zoology. The edition is packaged with 40 extraordinary, suitable-for-framing prints representing each essay. NATURAL HISTORIES is published by Sterling Signature. It is available at the American Museum of Natural History's bookshop and wherever books are sold.
Inside the Collections: Pacific Northwest Coast Peoples
 
04:26
While highlights from the Museum's collection of artifacts from the Pacific Northwest Coast are on display in the Hall of Northwest Coast Indians, more than 13,000 objects are kept in storage in the Division of Anthropology. Join Curator of North American Ethnology Peter Whitely as he leads a tour of the collections, which includes a giant Kwakwka'wakw whale mask, a Chilkat blanket with three different interpretations of its abstract symbolism, and a Haida/Tsimshian raven rattle. Many of the artifacts in the Division of Anthropology's Pacific Northwest Coast Collection were amassed during a series of expeditions in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. The most scientifically important of these expeditions, the Jesup North Pacific Expedition led by anthropologist Franz Boas between 1897 and 1902, collected more than 4,000 objects. Visitors can also find a number of whale-related artifacts from the Anthropology collections in the Museum's special exhibition, "Whales: Giants of the Deep," now open through January 5, 2014. For more information, visit http://www.amnh.org/exhibitions/current-exhibitions/whales-giants-of-the-deep. CREDITS: MUSIC: "Certain Death (Still Alive Remix)" by Blackberry "lenox" and "sunspot" by Moby Indiana University Archives of Traditional Music, 54-121-F, Kwakiutl Indians recorded by Franz Boas and John Comfort Fillmore at the World's Columbian Exposition in Chicago, 1893 PHOTOGRAPHY: AMNH/E. Labenski AMNH/R. Mickens AMNH Library Archives/T. Bierwert AMNH Library Archives/411184 AMNH Library Archives/338431/Group of Sitka Indians at Klukwan Potlach, J. M. Blankenberg, 1910 MAPS: AMNH/Division of Anthropology, Distribution Map by Franz Boas, 1896 Traditional Tlingit Map by Andrew Hope III, copyright Tlingit Readers Inc. VIDEO: AMNH/J. Bauerle
How Were Pterosaurs Adapted for Flight?
 
03:30
Pterosaurs were the first animals after insects to evolve powered flight—not just leaping or gliding, but flapping their wings to generate lift and travel through the air. They evolved into dozens of species: Some were as large as an F-16 fighter jet, and others as small as a paper airplane. Pterosaurs flew with their forelimbs: Their long, tapering wings evolved from the same body part as our arms. As pterosaurs' arm and hand bones evolved for flying, they lengthened, and the bones of one finger—the equivalent of our ring finger—became extraordinarily long. Like the mast on a ship, these bones supported the wing surface, a thin flap of skin that was shaped like a sail. Although many animals can glide through the air, pterosaurs, birds and bats are the only vertebrates that have evolved to fly by flapping their wings. All three groups descended from animals that lived on the ground, and their wings evolved in a similar way: their forelimbs gradually became long, bladelike and aerodynamic. Although they have much in common, pterosaurs, birds and bats developed the ability to fly independently. Their wings evolved along different paths, and the difference can be seen in their structure. Pterosaurs: Flight in the Age of Dinosaurs is on view from April 5, 2014, through January 4, 2015. Learn more about the exhibition at http://www.amnh.org/pterosaurs. Episode 1: What Is a Pterosaur? http://youtu.be/VCr1aZ3AAwo Episode 2: Why Are Pterosaur Fossils So Rare? http://youtu.be/M-5C5R0zajI Episode 3: Why Did Pterosaurs Have Crests? http://youtu.be/HlxAxJnJe4I Episode 4: How are Pterosaur Names Pronounced? http://youtu.be/JKPYDGKdEzY Episode 5: How Were Pterosaurs Adapted for Flight? http://youtu.be/erwczioi9us Episode 6: Meet the Paleontologists http://youtu.be/1VukMb4yk5M *** Subscribe to our channel: http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=AMNHorg Check out our full video catalog: http://www.youtube.com/user/AMNHorg Facebook: http://fb.com/naturalhistory Twitter: http://twitter.com/amnh Tumblr: http://amnhnyc.tumblr.com/ Instagram: http://instagram.com/amnh *** VIDEO CREDITS: Executive Producer Hélène Alonso Director/Editor/Writer Sarah Galloway Consultant/Writer Michael B. Habib Animation Camila Engelbert Joshua Krause Media Systems Designer Ariel Nevarez Editorial Support Lauri Halderman Alexandra Nemecek Martin Schwabacher Graphic Design Kelvin Chiang Dan Ownbey Catharine Weese Music "Everlong Song" by G. Small and F. Gerard/ Warner Chappell Production Music Footage/Stills Courtesy of Holger Babinsky, Department of Engineering, University of Cambridge Craig Chesek/AMNH Footage Bank HD Nature Footage Pond5 Shutterstock Footage Research José Ramos Rosemary Rotondi Narration Melynda Sims
Ten Steps of Tortoise Taxidermy with Lonesome George
 
02:15
Go behind the scenes to learn about the process of preserving Lonesome George, the iconic Pinta Island tortoise from the Galapagos who was the last of his species. Lonesome George is on view at the Museum through January 4, 2015. Preserving Lonesome George http://youtu.be/AZKbO2B7po0 Museum Helps Preserve Iconic Tortoise Lonesome George http://youtu.be/xLAuG_ms7QE Lonesome George and the Galapagos Today: What the Tortoise Taught Us http://youtu.be/m3dVbCB8A3g *** Subscribe to our channel: http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=AMNHorg Check out our full video catalog: http://www.youtube.com/user/AMNHorg Facebook: http://fb.com/naturalhistory Twitter: http://twitter.com/amnh Tumblr: http://amnhnyc.tumblr.com/ Instagram: http://instagram.com/amnh *** This video and all media incorporated herein (including text, images, and audio) are the property of the American Museum of Natural History or its licensors, all rights reserved. The Museum has made this video available for your personal, educational use. You may not use this video, or any part of it, for commercial purposes, nor may you reproduce, distribute, publish, prepare derivative works from, or publicly display it without the prior written consent of the Museum. © American Museum of Natural History, New York, NY
Six Ways To Prepare a Coelacanth - Shelf Life #3
 
06:51
The story of the Museum's coelacanth shows how natural history collections can yield answers and inspire questions for hundreds of years. Ichthyology Curator Melanie L. J. Stiassny presents the ultimate fish tale and offers a primer on specimen prep. For more about this iconic prehistoric fish, and the longstanding mystery that was put to rest when the Museum’s specimen was dissected, head over to the episode website: http://www.amnh.org/shelf-life/shelf-life-six-ways-to-prepare-a-coelacanth Shelf Life is a collection for curious minds—opening doors, pulling out drawers, and taking the lids off some of the incredible, rarely seen items in the American Museum of Natural History. Over the next year, Shelf Life will explore topics like specimen preparation, learn why variety is vital, and meet some of the people who work in the Museum collections. For more, visit http://www.amnh.org/ShelfLife Series Trailer https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=A2PmDLfWt1Q Episode 1: 33 Million Things https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5NR-xl7W0vo Episode 2: Turtles and Taxonomy https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XmXqn9AW2Kc Episode 3: Six Ways to Prepare a Coelacanth https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WqL17uabbso Episode 4: Skull of the Olinguito https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OEYfY0mRc5k Episode 5: How To Time Travel To a Star https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=S5xJqFtPGAA Episode 6: The Tiniest Fossils https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JLSa8cGJixQ Episode 7: The Language Detectives https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=92IvcuQF9cg Episode 8: Voyage of the Giant Squid https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=W47by1jPTPw Episode 9: Kinsey’s Wasps https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lHc5l4gQsro Episode 10: The Dinosaurs of Ghost Ranch https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=567bv6xmuss Episode 11: Green Grow the Salamanders https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uV9Z-pHr-nE Episode 12: Six Extinctions In Six Minutes https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AZuwOgcS1W0 *** Subscribe to our channel: http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=amnhorg Check out our full video catalog: http://www.youtube.com/user/AMNHorg Facebook: http://fb.com/naturalhistory Twitter: http://twitter.com/amnh Tumblr: http://amnhnyc.tumblr.com/ Instagram: http://instagram.com/amnh This video and all media incorporated herein (including text, images, and audio) are the property of the American Museum of Natural History or its licensors, all rights reserved. The Museum has made this video available for your personal, educational use. You may not use this video, or any part of it, for commercial purposes, nor may you reproduce, distribute, publish, prepare derivative works from, or publicly display it without the prior written consent of the Museum. © American Museum of Natural History, New York, NY
Why Are There No Planets in the Asteroid Belt?
 
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The asteroid belt provides important clues into the history of our solar system. Meteorite specialist Denton Ebel, curator in the Division of Physical Sciences, explains different theories of solar system formation and how the asteroid belt figures into the stable configuration of planets that we know today. ASTEROID CRASH COURSE Asteroids can be hazardous to life on Earth, but they also provide clues about the early solar system. In the Asteroid Crash Course video series, Denton Ebel, curator in the Museum's Division of Physical Sciences, explains how asteroids formed and the varying degrees of destruction they cause when they fall to Earth. What is an Asteroid? https://youtu.be/LopiH8cXtkI Meteorite, Meteor: What’s the Difference? https://youtu.be/9NASWzKQ-2I What Were the Biggest Asteroids to Hit Earth? https://youtu.be/CGkjTYqtpco Can Asteroids Be Deflected? https://youtu.be/iVJPf_dqQyc What Happens When Large Meteorites Fall to Earth? https://youtu.be/jm_NHMPnv34 How Are Large Asteroids Tracked? https://youtu.be/JGtKyYxmvpY VIDEO CREDITS: WHY ARE THERE NO PLANETS IN THE ASTEROID BELT? Credits VIDEO: AMNH/J. Bauerle PHOTOGRAPHY ESA/Rosetta Eumestat VISUALIZATIONS B612 Foundation “Journey to the Stars” by AMNH, the California Academy of Sciences, GOTO Inc., Papalote Museo del Niño, and And Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum NASA NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center/Conceptual Image Lab NASA/JPL MUSIC “Solar System” by G. Small and F. Gerard/ Warner Chappell Production Music SOUND EFFECTS “Asteroid Bad Connection Breathless Stinger” by Sam Ecoff and Samuel E. Ghanish/Warner Chappell Production Music “Harp Glisses” by Craig Sharmat/Warner Chappell Production Music “Spooky Spiral” by Robert Dudzic, Warner Chappell Production Music Freesound.org/martian, RMaudio, Selector JOURNEY TO THE STARS Journey to the Stars was developed by the American Museum of Natural History, New York in collaboration with the California Academy of Sciences, San Francisco; GOTO INC, Tokyo, Japan; Papalote Museo del Niño, Mexico City, Mexico and Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum, Washington, D.C. Journey to the Stars was created by the American Museum of Natural History, with the major support and partnership of NASA, Science Mission Directorate, Heliophysics Division. Made possible through the generous sponsorship of Lockheed Martin. And proudly sponsored by Accenture. Supercomputing resources provided by the Texas Advanced Computing Center (TACC) at The University of Texas at Austin, through the TeraGrid, a project of the National Science Foundation. StorNext File System donated by Quantum.
Dinosaurs Among Us
 
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The evolution of life on Earth is full of amazing episodes. But one story that really captures the imagination is the transition from the familiar, charismatic dinosaurs that dominated the planet for around 170 million years into a new, small, airborne form: birds. The Museum’s new exhibition, “Dinosaurs Among Us,” explores the continuities between living dinosaurs—birds—and their extinct ancestors, showcasing remarkable new evidence for what scientists now call one of the best-documented evolutionary transitions in the history of life. The Museum gratefully acknowledges the Richard and Karen LeFrak Exhibition and Education Fund. Dinosaurs Among Us is proudly supported by Chase Private Client. Additional support is generously provided by Dana and Virginia Randt. VIDEO CREDITS: VIDEO AMNH/J. Bauerle AMNH/S. Galloway Dahlia Kozlowsky Erica Rowell Ben Tudhope PHOTOGRAPHY AMNH/C. Chesek AMNH/M. Ellison AMMH/R. Mickens ILLUSTRATION Zhao Chuang Mick Ellison ANIMATION Bob Peterson MUSIC “Enlighten” by Tim Butcher/ Warner Chappell Production Music ADDITIONAL VIDEO AMNH/E. Chapman athurstock/Shutterstock.com A. M. Balanoff Ashley M. Heers Heinsbergsphotos/Shutterstock.com Bret Tobalske/University of Montana Stock media provided by Alcedo, ammit, bobhof, EcoMedia, erectus, faraways, , Robert Howard, Mark O’ Connell, Sergey Panayotov, pzaxe/Pond5.com
Restoring Dioramas in Hall of North American Mammals
 
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An expert team of conservators and Museum artists led a masterful restoration of the Hall of North American Mammals, which first opened in 1942 and has offered generations of Museum visitors spectacular views of North America's natural heritage. Here, in the iconic dioramas based on precise field observations, are scenes featuring the moose and brown bears of Alaska, cougars in the Grand Canyon, and the wolves of Gunflint Lake, Minnesota, among others. The restored Hall of North American Mammals reopened October 2012. CREDITS: PHOTOGRAPHY: AMNH Archives VIDEO: AMNH/J. Bauerle *** Subscribe to our channel: http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=AMNHorg Check out our full video catalog: http://www.youtube.com/user/AMNHorg Facebook: http://fb.com/naturalhistory Twitter: http://twitter.com/amnh Tumblr: http://amnhnyc.tumblr.com/ Instagram: http://instagram.com/amnh ***

Pubg Forums Xbox Can Be Fun for Everyone

Pubg Forums Xbox - Dead or Alive?

You need to compose an interesting and appealing profile, post a decent and recent photo and so forth. If youve got specific feedback for things we might change to create the system better, weve got forums for that. Our forums and internet chat area are a terrific place to meet and interact with different members.
An internet dating site devoted to health buffs for example, is pretty much enjoy a health club, but for the treadmill of course. If you prefer the most accurate price check, conduct the initial two methods and youll be helpful to go. There are several tier lists to help you decide which heroes you ought to be placing your time into, and thus dont take the word of the very first list you read. Instead, youre restricted to the amount of weapons and items you may carry at the same time. Especially if the quantity of players playing from PC proceeds to increase.
Pubg Forums Xbox Can Be Fun for Everyone

Its possible for you to reconnect at any point in a match youve left provided that you dont have a leaver penalty. There is no purpose in setting a question which everyone will know the response to. Another very good suggestion for your writing quiz questions is to attempt to keep the questions interesting. There are lots of totally free quiz questions online, but nevertheless, it can have a very long time to compose a great quiz and guarantee the answers are accurate so it can be well worth buying a pre-made quiz online. If a person doesnt know the answer, they ought to want to understand.
You will need to talk with your friend. If its not, attempt to stay friends with your initial friend. Not everybody is likely to get along so concentrate on the folks who have proven to be your true friend. In life, it is quite normal for individuals to have different friends and see them on various occasions.
If you disconnect during a competitive match, attempt to reconnect as soon as possible and complete the match. Of course whenever youre building the ideal team youll want the best heroes in the game. All it needed was a group of lemmings ready to have a beating.
Games unfortunately are a luxury and not a necessity, so they are most likely likely to be among the very first things to think about when deciding where you have to cut back on so far as your budget is concerned. In case you go over 100, youre out of the game. Finally, the play constricts to a very small area for the last showdown between the rest of the players there can only be one winner! Some players may discover that reinstalling PUBG is also essential. Many players can resolve their crashes by temporarily removing all graphics card overclocking. It is possible to always try out working with your fellow players and us Blue Posters here in order to get the reason for your tech issue.
The Death of Pubg Forums Xbox

Unlike PUBG, youre in a position to carry over two guns. Pressing Y cycles through your three guns, so if you would like to change from your secondary gun to your primary, you want to switch twice as a way to cycle via your pistol. In addition, all weapons are removed from the starting locations.